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HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



I'M VI RSITY OP 



7 * 



MUSA PEDESTRIS 



/Ifousa flbefcestris. 

THREE CENTURIES OF 

CANTING SONGS AND SLANG RHYMES 
[1536-1896] 

COLLECTED AND ANNOTATED 
BY 

JOHN S. FARMER 



PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY \ \^ \ G 

nx*^ I 

MDCCCXCVI * C 




CONTENTS 



Index to Titles V 

Index to Authors IX 

Forewords xm 

Notes 199245 

Appendix 247 251 

Text. Notes. 

"A beggar I'll be" (Anon 1660) 26 208 

" A Gage of Ben Rom-Bouse" (Middleton and 

Dekker 1611) 10 204 

"A Hundred Stretches Hence" (G. W. Matsell 

1859) 159 242 

'Any at a Political Picnic (T. Milliken 1884). 165 242 

Beggar's Curse, The (Thomas Dekker 1608). 3 201 
" Bing Out, Bien Morts " (Thomas Dekker 

1612) it 205 

Black Procession, The (Anon 1712) .... 37 211 

Blooming ./Esthetic (Anon 1882) 163 

Bobby and His Mary (Anon 1826) .... 94 228 

Bould Yeoman, The (Pierce Egan 1842) . . 136 241 
Bridle-cull and his little Pop-gun (Pierce Egan 

1842) 139 241 

Budg and Snudg Song, A (Anon 1676) . . 30 208 

Bunter's Christening, The (G. Parker 1789) . 69 219 

By-blow of the Jug, The (Pierce Egan 1842). 144 241 



vi CONTENTS 

Text. Notes. 

Cadger's Ball, The (Anon 1852) 147 241 

Canter's Serenade, The (Anon 1725). ... 43 211 

Chickaleary Cove, The (Vance 1864). . . . 161 242 

"Come all you Buffers Gay" (Anon 1760). 52 216 

Coster's Serenade, The (A. Chevalier 1894). 195 245 

Culture in the Slums (W. E. Henley 1887). 178 243 

Dashy Splashy . . . little Stringer, The (Leman 

Rede 1841) 134 240 

"Dear-Bill This Stone Jug" (Anon 1857). 152 241 

Double Cross, The (W. H. Ainsworth 1834). 117 239 

Faker's New Toast, The (Bon Gualtier 1841). 127 240 

Flashey Joe (R. Morley 1826) 96 

Flashman of St. Giles, The (Anon 1790). . 74 219 

Frisky Moll's Song (J. Harper 1724) ... 41 211 

Game of High Toby, The (W. H. Ainsworth 

l8 34) 115 239 

Happy Pair, The (G. Parker 1789) .... 67 219 
High Pad's Boast, The (J. Fletcher 1625) . 21 207 
High Pad's Frolic, The (Leman Rede 1841). 132 240 
Housebreaker's Song, The (G. W. M. Rey- 
nolds 1838) . 122 239 

Jack Flashman (Pierce Egan 1842) .... 141 241 

Lag's Lament, The (H. T. R. 1829) . . . 109 235 

Leary Man, The (Ducange Anglicus 1857) . 154 242 

Leary Mot, A (Anon 1.8 1 1) 77 219 

Masqueraders, The (G. Parker 1789) ... 72 219 

Maunder's Initiation, The (J.Fletcher 1625). 19 206 
Maunder's Praise of his Strowling Mort, The 

(Anon 1707) 33 209 

Maunder's Wooing, The (S. Rowlands 1610). 7 204 

Merry Beggars, The (R. Brome 1641). . . 23 207 



CONTENTS vii 

Text. Notes. 

Milling Match, The (T. Moore 1819) ... 84 223 

Miss Dolly Trull (Pierce Egan 1842) ... 143 241 

Mort's Drinking Song, A (R. Brome 1641) . 25 208 

My Mother (Bon Gualtier 1841) 130 240 

My mugging maid (J. Bruton 1826) .... 98 

"Nix my Doll, Pals, Fake Away" (W. Har- 
rison Ainsworth 1834) 112 237 

Nutty Blowen, The (Bon Gualtier 1841) . . 125 240 

Oath of the Canting Crew, The (R. Goadby 

1749) 50 2I 3 

On the Prigging Lay (H. T. R. 1829) . . 106 233 

Our Little Nipper (A. Chevalier 1893) . . . 192 245 

Pickpocket's Chaunt, The (W. Maginn 1829). 102 229 

Plank-bed Ballad, A (G. R. Sims 1888) . . 184 245 

Poor Luddy (T. Dibdin 1826) 100 228 

Potato Man, The (Anon 1775) 54 216 

"Retoure my dear Dell" (Anon 1725). . . 44 212 

Rhyme of the Rusher (Doss Chiderdoss 1892). 187 
Rhymes of the Canting Crew (R. Copland 

I53 6 ) * 199 

Rondeau of the Knock, The (G. R. Sims 

1890) .186 245 

" Rum Coves that Relieve Us " (H. Baumann 

1887) 171 243 

Rum-Mort's Praise of her Faithless Maunder, 

The (Anon 1707) 35 210 

Sandman's Wedding, The (G. Parker 1789). 64 217 
Slang Pastoral, A (R. Tomlinson 1780) . . 56 216 
Song of the Beggar, The (Anon 1620) . . 14 206 
Song of the Young Prig, The (Anon 1810-9). 82 222 
Sonnets for the Fancy : I. Education. II. Pro- 
gress. III. Triumph (Pierce Egan 1824). 90 225 



vni CONTENTS 

Text.' Notes. 
" The Faking Boy to the Crap is Gone " (Bon 

Gualtier 1841) 124 240 

The Night before Larry was stretched (W. 

Maher 1816) 79 220 

Thieves' Chaunt, The (W. H. Smith 1836). 120 

Tottie (G. R. Sims 1887) 182 245 

" Towre Out, Ben Morts " (S. Rowlands 1 6 10). 5 202 

True Bottom'd Boxer, The (J. Jones 1825). 92 227 

Vain Dreamer, The (Anon 1725) 46 212 

Villon's Good Night (W. E. Henley 1887) . 174 243 

Villon's Straight Tip (W. E. Henley 1887). 176 243 

" When my Dimber Dell I Courted " (Anon 

1725) 48 212 

"Wot Cher" (A. Chevalier 1892) 190 245 

" Ye Scamps, ye Pads, ye Divers " (Messink 

1781) 61 217 

"Ya-Hip, my Hearties!" (Gregson 1819). . 88 224 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



Ainsworth, W. Harrison 112, 115, 117 

Anonymous, 14, 26, 30, 33, 35, 37, 43, 44, 46, 48, 52, 
54. 74. 77, 82, 90, 94, 147, 152, 163 

Baumann, Heinrich 171 

Bon Gualtier 124, 125, 127, 130 

Brome, Richard 23, 25 

Bruton, James 98 

Chevalier, Albert 190, 192, 195 

Copland, Robert i 

Dekker, Thomas 3, 10, II 

Dibdin, Thomas 100 

Doss Chiderdoss 187 

Ducange Anglicus i$4 

Egan, Pierce 136, 139, 141, 143, 144 

Fletcher, John 19. 2I 

Goadby, Robert 5 

Gregson 88 

Harper, J 4 1 

Henley, W. Ernest 174, 176, 178 

H. T. R. , . 106, 109 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



s, J .................... 92 

Maginn, William .......... IO2 

Maher, Will ............ ?g 

Matsell, G. W ........... '.'.'.'. '159 

Mcssink ......... ^j 

Middleton, Thomas .......... IO 

Milliken, T ............... I f > ^ 

Moore, Thomas ............ _ 3. 

Morley, R ................... ?6 

Parker, George ....... .... 64, 67, 69, 72 

Rede, Leman ........... j7 2 t 7 4 

Reynolds, G. W. M ........... 122 

Rowlands, Samuel .......... . 5, 7 

Sims, G. R .............. I g 2 , 184, 186 

Smith, W. H ............. I2O 

Tomlinson, R .............. 55 

Vance ........ IOI 



FOREWORDS 




FOREWORDS 

WHEN Harrison Ainsworth, in his preface to 
Rookwood, claimed to be " the first to write a 
purely flash song " he was very wide of the mark . 
As a matter of fact, " Nix my doll, pals, fake 
away!" had been anticipated, in its treatment of 
canting phraseology, by nearly three centuries, 
and subsequently, by authors whose names stand 
high, in other respects, in English literature. 

The mistake, however, was not altogether un- 
pardonable ; few, indeed, would have even guessed 
that the appearance of utter neglect which sur- 
rounded the use of Cant and Slang in English 
song, ballad, or verse its rich and racy character 
notwithstanding was anything but of the surface. 
The chanson d'argot of France and the romance 
di germania of Spain, not to mention other forms 
of the MUSA PEDESTRIS had long held popular 
sway, but there was to all appearance nothing 
to correspond with them on this side the silver 
streak. 

It must be confessed, however, that the field 
of English slang verse and canting song, though 



xiv FOREWORDS 

not altogether barren, has yet small claim to the 
idiomatic and plastic treatment that obtains in 
many an Argot-song and Germania-romance; in 
truth, with a few notable exceptions, there is little 
in the present collection that can claim literary 
rank. 

Those exceptions, however, are alone held to 
be ample justification for such an anthology as 
that here presented. Moreover these " Rhymes 
and Songs", gathered from up and down the 
years, exhibit, en masse, points of interest to the 
student and scholar that, in isolation, were either 
wanting altogether, or were buried and lost sight 
of midst a mass of more (or less) valuable matter. 

As regards the Vulgar Tongue itself though 
exhaustive disquisition obviously lies outside the 
scope of necessarily brief forewords it may be 
pointed out that its origin in England is con- 
fessedly obscure. Prior to the second half of 
the 1 6th century, there was little trace of that 
flood of unorthodox speech which, in this year 
of grace eighteen hundred and ninety-six, requires 
six quarto double-columned volumes duly to 
chronicle verily a vast and motley crowd! 

As to the distinction to be drawn between 
Cant and Slang it is somewhat difficult to speak. 
Cant we know; its limits and place in the world 
of philology are well denned. In Slang, however, 
we have a veritable Proteus, ever shifting, and for 
the most part defying exact definition and orderly 
derivation. Few, save scholars and such-like 



FOREWORDS xv 

folk, even distinguish between the two, though 
the line of demarcation is sharply enough denned. 

In the first place, Slang is universal, whilst 
Cant is restricted in usage to certain classes of 
the community: thieves, vagrom men, and well, 
their associates. One thing, indeed, both have 
in common; each are derived from a correct 
normal use of language. There, however, all 
similarity ends. 

Slang boasts a quasi-respectability denied to 
Cant, though Cant is frequently more enduring, 
its use continuing without variation of meaning 
for many generations. With Slang this is the 
exception; present in force to-day, it is either 
altogether forgotten to-morrow, or has shaded off 
into some new meaning a creation of chance 
and circumstance. Both Cant and Slang, but 
Slang to a more determinate degree, are mirrors 
in which those who look may see reflected a 
picture of the age, with its failings, foibles, and 
idiosyncrasies. They reflect the social life of the 
people, the mirror rarely being held to truth so 
faithfully hence the present interest, and may 
be future value, of these songs andrhymes. For 
the rest the book will speak for itself. 





flfcusa flbebestrte. 

RHYMES OF THE CANTING CREW. 

[>. 1536] [Notes] 

[From " The Hye-way to the Spyttel-hous" by 
ROBERT COPLAND (HAZLITT, Early Popular 
Poetry of England, iv.) ROBERT COPLAND 
and the Porter of St. Bartholomew's Hos- 
pital loquitor], 

Copland. Come none of these pedlers this way 

[also, 

With pak on bak with their bousy speche crapulous 

Jagged and ragged with broken hose and breche ? 

Porter. Inow, ynow; with bousy coue maimed nace, [Notes] 
Teare the patryng coue in the darkeman cace 
Docked the dell for a coper meke; 

i 



2 RHYMES OF THE CANTING CREW 

His watch shall feng a prounces nob-chete, 
Cyarum, by Salmon, and thou shall pek my jere 
In thy gan, for my watch it is nace gere 
For the bene bouse my watch hath a coyn. 

And thus they babble tyll their thryft is thin 
I wote not what with their pedlyng frenche. 




THE BEGGAR'S CURSE 




[Notes] 



[From Lanthorne and Candlelight, by THOMAS 
DEKKER, ed. GROSART (188 ), iii, 203: "a 
canting song, wherein you may learn, how 
this cursed generation pray, or (to speake 
truth) curse such officers as punish them"]. 



The devil take 

The Kurhn cly the nab of the Harmanbeck, the Constable's 

head! 



If we mawnd Pannam, lap, or Ruff-peck, 

_. Or milk porridge, 

Or poplars of yarum : he cuts, bmg to the Ruffmans, he says: "be >s 

to the hedges" 

Or els he sweares by the light-mans, ^oS* in the 



To put our stamps in the Harmans, T n S^odc!?** 

The devil take 

The ruffian cly the ghost of the Harmanbeck the Constable's 

ghost 

If we heaue a booth we cly the lerk. if we rob a house 

we are flogged. 

II 

If we fornicate, or 
If We niggle, Or mill a bowzinp- Ken, thieve in an ale- 

house, 
,". i ., . 1 , . Rob a purse with 

Or nip a boung that has but a win, O ni y a penny in 

it. 



4 THE BEGGAR'S CURSE 

Or break into /~v j ,. . / /-< / i 

a gentleman 1 * Or dup the giger of a Gentry cofes ken, 

house, 

T e the o magistrate ^ tne ( l u ^ er cuffing we bing; 

^"shackfcd 01 t0 And then to tlie l uier Ken> to scowre tne Cramp-ring, 



Whence to be ^nd then to the Trin'de on the chates, in the light- 
hanged on the 
gallows in the _ 
morning. [mans. 


The pox and the The 
devil take the 
Constable and 
his stocks. 


Bube & Ruffian cly the Harmanbeck 
& harmans. 




"TOWRE OUT BEN MORTS 



"TOWRE OUT BEN MORTS" [Notes] 

[1610] 

[By SAMUEL ROWLANDS in "Martin Mark-all, 
Beadle of Bridewell: His Defence and Answer e 
to the Belman of London"]. 



Towre out ben morts & towre, look-out, good 

women ; 

Looke out ben morts & towre, all the Rome . 

coves [Notes] 

For all the Rome coues are budgd a beake, have run away 

[Notes] 

And the quire coves tippe the lowre. iSSSLt. 



II 

The quire coues are budgd to the bowsing ken, ^ Sousl 

As Romely as a ball, nimbly 

But if we be spid we shall be clyd, whipped 

And carried to the quirken hall. taken to gaol. 



"TOWRE OUT BEN MORTS 



in 



"hTh^f' ' Out bu dgd the Coue of the ken, 
staff; hand. With a ben filtch in his quarr'me 
T'thema'nwS That did the P ri gg god that bingd in the kisome, 

had given the 

alarm. To towre the Coue budge alar'me. 




THE MAUNDER'S WOOING 



THE MAUNDER'S WOOING [NoteS ] 

[1610] 

[By SAMUEL ROWLANDS in Martin Mark-all, 
Beadle of Bridewell: His Defence and Answere 
to the Belman of London: "I will shew you 
what I heard at Knock-vergos, drinking there 
a pot of English Ale, two Maunders borne and 
bred vp rogues wooing in their natiue lan- 
guage "]. 



O Ben mort wilt thou pad with me. s od woman 

tramp 

One ben slate shall serue both thee and me, sheet 

My Caster and Commission shall serue vs both to cloak ; shirt ; beg 

[maund, 

My bong, my lowre & fambling cheates purse; money; 
Shall be at thy command. 

ii 

O Ben Coue that may not be, good man 

For thou hast an Autem mort who euer that is she, wife 

If that she were dead & bingd to his long tibb, s ne to heriong- 

home 

Then would I pad and maund with thee, tramp and beg 

And wap and fon the fibb. [Notes] 



THE MAUNDER'S WOOING 

in 

find out O ben mort Castle out & Towre, 

'gratlfgetmonly: Wnere all the Roome coues slopne that we may 

[tip the lowre, 

sold the swag Whe we haue tipt the lowre & fenc't away the duds 
g house tb ale " Then bin S e we to the bowzing ken, 
C Ho d d be '' R bin Thats cut the R obin Hood. 



IV 



arrested? But ben Coue what if we be clyd, 

cheat and steal Long we cannot foist & nip at last we shall be 

[spyed, 

If that we be spied, O then begins our woe, 
magistrate With the Harman beake out and alas, 

Newgate To VVittington we goe. 



Stow y ur whids & plant, and whid no more 

[of that 

[Notes] Budg a beak the crackmas & tip lowr with thy prat 

hanging; pick a If treyning thou dost feare, thou ner wilt foist 

[a Ian, 

rob; whore; hang Then mill, and wap and treine for me, 
[Notes] A gere peck in thy gan. 

As they were thus after a strange maner a 

[Notes] wooing, in comes by chance a clapper-dudgeon 

for a pinte of Ale, who as soone as he was spied, 



THE MAUNDER'S WOOING 9 

they left off their roguish poetry, and fell to mocke 
the poor maunder thus. 



VI 



The clapper dugeon lies in the skipper, beggar; bam 

He dares not come out for shame, 

But when he binges out he dus budg to thegigger, 

Tip in my skew good dame. 




io "A GAGE OF BEN ROM-BOUSE" 



[Notes] "A GAGE OF BEN ROM-BOUSE" 

[1611] 

[By MIDDLETON and DEKKER in " 7 he Roaring Girt" 
v. i. Sung by Moll- Cut-purse and Tearcal 
a bullying rogue.] 

Moll. Come you rogue, sing with me : 



) ODgale A S a g e of ben Rom-bouse, 

London ale-house In a bousing-ken of Rom-vile 

b c e ioak than a Tearca t> Is benar than a Caster, 

meat,bread,drink, P Pr k npnnam Ian r>r 

or porridge r CUi ' P ennara > la P> or 



lie all day Moll. Oh, I wud lib all the lightmans, 

night Oh, I woud lib all the darkemans, 

^L'woodr' 1 " B y the Salomon, under the RufTemans 

stocks By the Salomon in the Hartmans 

in fetters Tearcat. And secure the queer cramp ring 

[Notes] And couch till a palliard dock'd my dell, 

addle-pate may .., , 

swill strong oo my bousy nab might skew rome bouse well 

drink 

Let us be ofi on ! AvaSt tO the P ad ' let US bin gJ 
the road. I . 

iAvast to the pad, let us bing. 






"BING OUT, BIEN MORTS" 11 



"BING OUT, BIEN MORTS" [No tes] 

[1612] 

[From O per se O, by THOMAS DEKKER]. 

Bing out, bien Morts, and toure, and toure, G ^om b en ad ' g d 

bing out, bien Morts, and toure; a y d u; look ab ut 

For all your 

For all your Duds are bingd awaste, clothes are 

the bien coue hath the loure. *$**& 

has the money. 



I met a wench 

I met a Dell, I viewde her well, and summed her 

she suited me 

she was benship to my watch; very well 

So (joining com- 

So she and I, did stall and cloy, &* wh t 

I stole 

Whateuer We COUld Catch. whatever came 

our way. 

II 
mi T-V i 11 i i_- T-'J This young whore 

This Doxie dell, can cut bien whids, can lie like truth, 

,. c . fornicate vigor- 

and Wap Well lor a Win; ouslyforapenny 

. , , , . , And steal very 

And prig and cloy so bensmply, cleverly 

on the country- 
all me dewsea-vile within, side 



12 "BING OUT, BIEN MORTS" 



in 

When the house rrii i i 

was alarmed we The boylc was vp, wee had good lucke, 

had good luck 

in spite of frost j n f ros t f or an( J j n snow; 

and snow 

To^ghtuswehid WhCn the ? dld Seek6 ' thCn WC dld Cree P 6 > 

in the woods. an( j pi an t i n ruffe-mans low. 

IV 

To a thieves' 

th c e e wom g an h go e : To Stawling Kenne the Mort bings then, 
to get money for to fetch loure for her cheates 

the swag 

[Notes] Duds and Ruff-pecke, rumboild by Harmanbecke, 
g ' ^y.f Ague's and won by Mawnder's feates. 

aextenty. 



Ye rogues do not 

brag of your You Mawnders all, stow what you stall, 
t0 not4raiSt 0are to * coues watch so quire; 

Or trust a mis- 

tress,who though And wapping Dell that niggles well, 
does so for hire. and takes loure for her hire. 



VI 

With a counter- 

forge^^ign^ And ^ be wel1 Ierkt ' lick rome-comfeck, 

tures [Notes] - 

as to losses by fire tor backe by ghmniar to mawnd, 



T mUI Cach Kett ' let COUG bi 



thro' hedge, ditch 

and field through ruffemans, lague or launde. 




"BING OUT, BIEN MORTS" 13 

VII 

Till Cramprings quier, tip Coue his hire, /^ are 

and quier-kens doe them catch ; a ? s f * te prison is 

A canniken, mill quier cuffen, V^S-tSS 

so quier to ben coue's watch. ^aclv^S 

vm 

A good-night 

Bein darkmans then, bouse, mort, and ken weTch^andTie- 

house 

the bien coue's bingd awast; the poor fellow 

is gone 

On chates to trine, by Rome-coues dine On the gallows 

for his long lib at last. t^LfK 



Bingd out bien morts, and toure, and toure, So go, my good 

woman 

bing out of the Rome-vile; out of London 

And toure the coue, that cloyde your duds, ^to'SiS'wS 

clothes 

upon the chates to trine. upon the gallows 

hanging. 



14 THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 



[Note,] THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 

[1620] 

[From "A Description of Love" 6th ed. (1629)]. 



penny 

ale-house 

drink 



I am Rogue and a stout one, 

A most courageous drinker, 
I doe excell, 'tis knowne full well, 
The Ratter, Tom, and Tinker. 

Still doe I cry, good your Worship good 

Bestow one small Denire, Sir [Sir, 
And brauely at the bousing Ken 
He bouse it all in Beere, Sir. 



ii 

purse; [Notes] If a Bung be got by the hie Law, 

Then straight I doe attend them, 
For if Hue and Crie doe follow, I 

A wrong way soone doe send them. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

in 

Ten miles vnto a Market. 

I runne to meet a Miser, 



THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 15 

Then in a throng, I nip his Bung, steal his purse 

And the partie ne'er the wiser. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 



My dainty Dais, my Doxis, girls; whores 

Whene'er they see me lacking, 
Without delay, poore wretches they 

Will set their Duds a packing. Clothe? 6 " 

Still doe I cry, etc. 



I pay for what I call for, 

And so perforce it must be, 
For as yet I can, not know the man, 

Nor Oastis that will trust me. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

VI 

If any giue me lodging, 

A courteous Knaue they find me, 
For in their bed, aliue or dead, 

I leave some Lice behind me. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

VII 

If a Gentry Coue be comming, gentleman 

Then straight it is our fashion, 



16 THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 

My Legge I tie, close to my thigh, 
To moue him to compassion. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

VIII 

My doublet sleeue hangs emptie, 
And for to begge the bolder, 

For meate and drinke mine arme I shrinke, 
Vp close vnto my shoulder. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

IX 

If a Coach I heere be rumbling, 
To my Crutches then I hie me, 

For being lame, it is a shame, 

Such Gallants should denie me. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 



With a seeming bursten belly, 

I looke like one half dead, Sir, 

Or else I beg with a woodden legge, 
And a Night-cap on me head, Sir, 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

XI 

In Winter time starke naked 
I come into some Citie, 
Then euery man that spare them can, 



THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 17 

Will giue me clothes for pittie. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

XII 

If from out the Low-countrie, [Notes] 

I heare a Captaines name, Sir, 
Then strait I swere I have bin there; 

And so in fight came lame, Sir. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

XIII 

My Dogge in a string doth lead me, 

When in the towne I goe, Sir, 
For to the blind, all men are kind, 

And will their Almes bestow, Sir, 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

XIV 

With Switches sometimes stand I, 

In the bottom of a Hill, Sir, 
There those men which doe want a switch, 

Some monie give me still, Sir. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

xv 

Come buy, come buy a Horne-booke, 

Who buys my Pins or Needles? 
In Cities I these things doe crie, 



i8 THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 

Oft times to scape the Beadles. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 



XVI 

[Notes] In Pauls Church by a Pillar; 

Sometimes you see me stand, Sir, 
With a Writ that showes, what care and woes 
I past by Sea and Land, Sir. 
Still doe I cry, etc. 

XVII 

Now blame me not for boasting, 
And bragging thus alone, Sir, 

For my selfe I will be praying still, 
For Neighbours have I none, Sir. 
Which makes me cry, etc. 




THE MAUNDER'S INITIATION 19 



THE MAUNDER'S INITIATION [Notes] 
[1622] 

[From The Beggar's Bush by JOHN FLETCHER ; 
also in The Neiv Canting Diet: "Sung on 
the electing of a new dimber damber, or 
king of the gypsies"]. 



Cast your nabs and cares away, 

This is maunder's holiday: beggar 

In the world look out and see, 
Where so blest a king as he 

(Pointing to the newly-elected Prince?) 

II 

At the crowning of our king, 

Thus we ever dance and sing: 
Where's the nation lives so free, 
And so merrily as we? 

in 

Be it peace, or be it war, 
Here at liberty we are: 

Hang all harmanbecks we cry, constables 

We the cuffins quere defy. magistrates 



20 THE MAUNDER'S INITIATION 

IV 

We enjoy our ease and rest, 

To the fields we are not pressed: 
And when taxes are increased, 
We are not a penny 'sessed. 



Nor will any go to law, 

With a maunder for a straw, 
All which happiness he brags, 
Is only owing to his rags. 

" Now swear him " 

\r r * pot th o y f I crown thy nab with a gage of ben bouse, 
And install tbcc, And stall thee by the salmon into clowes, 

by oath, a rogue 

^TteaVVom To maund on the pad, and strike all the cheats, 
Rob hedge of To mill from the Ruffmans, Commission, and 

shirt and sheet, 

[slates, 
TO lie with wench- Twang dells i' th' stiromel, and let the Quire 

es on the straw, 

so let all magis- [CllfFm 

trates and con- 
stables go to the 

devil and be And Harman Beck strine and trine to the rumn. 

hanged! 




THE HIGH PAD'S BOAST 21 



THE HIGH PAD'S BOAST 
[b. 1625] 

[Attributed to JOHN FLETCHER a song from a 
collection of black-letter broadside ballads. 
Also in New Canting Diet. 1725.] 



I keep my Horse; I keep my whore; 
I take no rents; yet am not poor; 
I travel all the land about, 
And yet was born to ne'er a foot. 



ii 

With partridge plump, and woodcock fine, 

At midnight, I do often dine: 

And if my whore be not in Case, in the 

My hostess' daughter has her place. 

in 

The maids sit up, and watch their turns; 
If I stay long, the tapster mourns; 
Nor has the cookmaid mind to sin, 
Tho' tempted by the chamberlain. 



22 THE HIGH PAD'S BOAST 



IV 

But when I knock, O how they bustle; 
The hostler yawns, the geldings justle: 
If the maid be sleepy, O how they curse her; 
And all this comes, of, Deliver your purse, sir. 




THE MERRY BEGGARS 23 



THE MERRY BEGGARS 
[1641] 

[From A Jovial Crew, by RICHARD BROME. The 
beggars discovered at their feast. After 
they have scrambled awhile at their Victuals : 
this song]. 



Here safe in our Skipper let's cly off our Peck, Safe in our bam 

let's eat 

And bowse in defiance o' the Harman Beck. A J ^fj'J; 
Here's Pannam and Lap, and good Poplars of Here's bread, 

drink, and milk- 

[Yarrum, porridge 
To fill up the Crib, and to comfort the Quarron. ^coSfortrife 

body. 

Now bowse a round health to the Go-well and Drink a good 

health [Notes] 

[Corn-well, 

To Cisley Bum- 

Of Cisley Bumtrincket that lies in the Strummel : trincket lying in 

the straw 
II 

Here's Ruffpeck and Casson, and all of the best, ^ r e e e ' s s e ^ acon and 
And Scrape of the Dainties of Gentry Cofe's ^JSgJSS 

rr? table 

[Feast. 



24 THE MERRY BEGGARS 

H m e uuon, goes?' Here ' s Grunter and Bleater, with Tib-of-the-Buttry, 
A w n en. c coo c ke e d.' *" And Margery Prater, all dress'd without sluttry. 
F an r d h ne f nl For a11 this bene Cribbing and Peck let us then, 

^nVhe^raifd Bowse a l ^ to the Gentry Cofe of the Ken. 

T bum P er drink * Now bowse a roun d health to the Go-well 

and Corn-well 

^riSST Bum " Of Cisley Bumtrincket that lies in the Strum- 

[mel. 




A MORT'S DRINKING SONG 25 



A MORT'S DRINKING SONG [Notes] 

[1641] 

[From A Jovial Crew, by RICHARD BROME : Enter 
Patrico with his old wife with a wooden 
bowle of drink. She is drunk. She sings : ] 



This is bien bowse, this is bien bowse, strong ale 

Too little is my skew. cup or platter 

I bowse no lage, but a whole gage water; pot 
Of this I'll bowse to you. 

ii 

This bowse is better than rom-bowse, wine 

It sets the gan a-gigling, mouth 

The autum-mort finds better sport wife 

In bowsing than in nigling. fornicating 
This is bien bowse, etc. 

[She tosses off her bowle, falls back and is 
carried out.] 




26 "A BEGGAR I'LL BE" 



[Notes] "A BEGGAR I'LL BE" 

[1660 1663] 

[A black-letter broadside ballad] 



A Beggar, a Beggar, a Beggar I'll be, 

There's none leads a life more jocund than he; 

A Beggar I was, and a Beggar I am, 

A Beggar I'll be, from a Beggar I came; 

If, as it begins, our trading do fall, 

We, in the Conclusion, shall Beggars be all. 

Tradesmen are unfortunate in their Affairs, 

And few Men are thriving but Courtiers and Play'rs. 

II 

[Notes] A Graver my Father, a Maunder my Mother, 
A Filer my Sister, a Filcher my Brother, 
A Canter my Uncle, that car'd not for Pelf, 
A Lifter my Aunt, and a Beggar myself; 
In white wheaten Straw, when their Bellies were 

[full, 

Then was I got between a Tinker and a Trull. 
And therefore a Beggar, a Beggar I'll be, 
For there's none lives a Life more jocund than he 



"A BEGGAR I'LL BE" 27 



in 

For such pretty Pledges, as Lullies from Hedges, wet linen 

We are not in fear to be drawn upon Sledges, 

But sometimes the Whip doth make us to skip 

And then we from Tything to Tything do trip; 

But when in a poor Boozing-Can we do bib it, ale-house 

We stand more in dread of the Stocks than the 

And therefore a merry mad Beggar I'll be [Gibbet 

For when it is night in the Barn tumbles he. 

IV 

We throw down no Altar, nor never do falter, 
So much as to change a Gold-chain for a Halter; 
Though some Men do flout us, and others do doubt 
We commonly bear forty Pieces about us; [us, 
But many good Fellows are fine and look fiercer, 
And owe for their Cloaths to the Taylor and Mercer : 
And if from the Harmans I keep out my Feet, stocks 
I fear not the Compter, King's Bench, nor the Fleet. [Notes] 



Sometimes I do frame myself to be lame, 

And when a Coach comes, I hop to my game; 

We seldom miscarry, or never do marry, 

By the Gown, Common-Prayer, or Cloak-Directory ; 

But Simon and Susan, like Birds of a Feather 

They kiss, and they laugh, and so jumble together; [Notes] 



28 "A BEGGAR I'LL BE" 

Like Pigs in the Pea-straw, intangled they lie, 
Till there they beget such a bold rogue as I. 



VI 



When Boys do come to us, and their Intent is 
To follow our Calling, we ne'er bind 'em 'Prentice ; 
Soon as they come to 't, we teach them to do H, 
And give them a Staff and a Wallet to boot; 
beggar's patter We teach them their Lingua, to crave and to cant, 
The Devil is in them if then they can want. 
And he or she, that a Beggar will be, 
Without any Indentures they shall be made free. 



VII 



We beg for our Bread, yet sometimes it happens 
We fast it with Pig, Pullet, Coney, and Capons 
The Church's Affairs, we are no Men-slayers, 
We have no Religion, yet live by our Prayers; 
But if when we beg, Men will not draw their 

[Purses, 
We charge, and give Fire, with a Volley of 

[Curses ; 

The Devil confound your good Worship, we cry, 
And such a bold brazen- fac'd Beggar am I. 



VIII 



We do things in Season, and have so much Reason, 
We raise no Rebellion, nor never talk Treason; 



" A BEGGAR I'LL BE " 29 

We Bill all our Mates at very low rates, 
While some keep their Quarters as high as the 

[fates ; 

With Shinkin-ap-Morgan, with Blue-cap, or Teague, [Notes] 
We into no Covenant enter, nor League. 
And therefore a bonny bold Beggar I'll be, 
For none lives a life more merry than he. 




30 A BUDG AND SNUDG SONG 



[Notes] A BUDG AND SNUDG SONG 

[1676 and 1712] 

[From A Warning for Housekeepers ... by one who 
was a prisoner in Newgate (1676. The 
second version from the Triumph of Wit(ij 1 2)]. 



S houseTfnd steal*- ^ ne bud g e ^ i a delicate trade, 
h n a g d anything t0 And a deh 'cate trade of fame; 

Accomplished the p or w h e n that we have bit the bloe, 

We carry away the game: 

fellow catches But if the cully nap us, 
S mone '/ pr perly And tne ^ un "^ es from us take, 

take us to New- Q then ) l^j^LJ us to the whitt 

gate; [Notes] (he rubs) 

(And it is hardly ) 

(Though we are not) worth a make 

ii 

JAnd! wnen tnat we come to the w r hitt 
fetters Our darbies to behold, 

, r (take our penitency 

And for to | do QU _ 



drink I \ boose the water cold. 



A BUDG AND SNUDG SONG 



But when that we come out agen 
[And the merry hick we meet] 

, (bite the Cully of) , . 

We 1 file off with i hls cole 

(we walk) 



. 

As 



he pikes 



the street 



m 



[And when that we have fil'd him 
Perhaps of half a job; 

Then every man to the boozin ken 
O there to fence his hog; 

But if the cully nap us, 

And once again we get 

Into the cramping, rings], 

But we are rubbed into) 



To secure them in 



the whitt. 



IV 



And when that we come ! unto ! the whitt, 

For garnish they do cry ; 

(Mary, faugh, you son of a whore 
(We promise our lusty comrogues 

( Ye ) 



[Then every man with his mort in his hand, 
Does booze off his can and part, 

With a kiss we part, and westward stand, 
To the nubbing cheat in a cart]. 



countryman 
steal his money 



robbed 

half a guinea 

ale-house 

spend a shilling 



Handcuffs and 
leg-shackles 



" footing " 



whore 



gallows 



32 A BUDG AND SNUDG SONG 



(But) , (that) L (Tyburn ) 

{And) when I - j we come to [the nubbing cheat) 



knife 



T>U j (Jack Catch) ., c (whore) 

[Notes] There stands jj ack Ketch j, that son of a | bitch [, 

That owes us all a grudge. 

(And) , ., . , , ,, (noosed ) 
hung | For j when that he hath j nubbed j us, 

give no money And our friends | .? \ him no cole, 

(O then he throws us in the cart ) 
(He takes his chive and cuts us down)' 

, (tumbles) (the) , 

And i tips j us mto i a i hole ' 

[Notes] [An additional stanza is given in JBacchus and 
Venus (1737), a version which moreover 
contains many verbal variations]. 

VI 

But if we have a friend stand by, 

Six and eight pence for to pay, 
Then they may have our bodies back, 

And carry us quite away: 
For at St Giles's or St Martin's, 

A burying place is still; 
And there's an end of a darkman's budge, 

And the whoreson hath his will. 



THE MAUNDER'S PRAISE 33 



THE MAUNDER'S PRAISE OF HIS 
STROWLING MORT 

[1707] 

[From The Triumph of Wit, by J. SHIRLEY : the 
King of the Gypsies's Song, made upon his 
Beloved Doxy, or Mistress;" also in New 
Canting Diet. (1725)]. 



Doxy, oh! thy glaziers shine mistress; eyes 

As glimmar; by the Salomon! fire; mass 

No gentry mort hath prats like thine, lady; [Notes] 

No cove e'er wap'd with such a one. [Notes] 

ii 

White thy fambles, red thy gan, hand; mouth 

And thy quarrons dainty is; body 

Couch a hogshead with me then, sleep 

And in the darkmans clip and kiss. night; [Notes] 

in 

What though I no togeman wear, cloak 

Nor commission, mish, or slate ; shirt or sheet 



straw 

in the barn; lie 



34 OF HIS STROWLING MORT. 

Store of strammel we'll have here, 
And ith' skipper lib in state. 



[Notes] 

the devil take 
the woman 

otherwise 

feet 

stockings; revel 



IV 



Wapping thou I know does love, 
Else the ruffin cly the mort; 

From thy stampers then remove, 

Thy drawers, and let's prig in sport. 



daylight 
hen 

chickens 
ale-house 



Money; steal 
pot ; steal a purse 
wine; drink 
eat; pig 



When the lightman up does call, 
Margery prater from her nest, 

And her Cackling cheats withal, 
In a boozing ken we'll feast. 



VI 



There if lour we want; I'll mill 
A gage, or nip for thee a bung; 

Rum booze thou shalt booze thy fill, 

And crash a grunting cheat that's young. 







THE RUM-MO RT'S PRAISE 35 



THE RUM-MORT'S PRAISE OF HER 
FAITHLESS MAUNDER 

[1707] 

[From The Ttiumph of Wit, by J. SHIRLEY: also 
in New Canting 



Now my kinching-cove is gone, little man 

By the rum-pad maundeth none, highway; beg- 

geth 

Quarrons both for stump and bone, body 

Like my clapperdogeon. [Notes] 



ii 

Dimber damber fare thee well, [Notes] 

Palliards all thou didst excel, [Note?] 

And thy jockum bore the Bell, [Notes] 

Glimmer on it never fell. [Notes] 

ni 

Thou the cramprings ne'er did scowre, fetters ; wear 

Harmans had on thee no power, stocks 

Harmanbecks did never toure; constables, look 

For thee, the drawers still had loure. pockets; money 



36 OF HER FAITHLESS MAUNDER 



IV 



clothes ; general 

plunder 
magistrate 

country 
gallows 



Duds and cheats thou oft hast won, 
Yet the cuffin quire couldst shun; 

And the deuseaville didst run, 

Else the chates had thee undone. 



[Notes] 



night 
hedge 
fire; duck 
goose 



turkey 
bacon 



any potable ; 
porridge 



dog ; wooden dish 

hook ; counterfeit 

pass, 
cloak 



Crank and dommerar thou couldst play, 
Or rum-maunder in one day, 

And like an Abram-cove couldst pray, 
Yet pass with gybes well jerk'd away. 



VI 



When the darkmans have been wet, 

Thou the crackmans down didst beat 

For glimmer, whilst a quaking cheat, 
Or tib-o'-th'-buttry was our meat. 



VII 



Red shanks then I could not lack, 
Ruff peck still hung on my Back, 

Grannam ever fill'd my sack 

With lap and poplars held I tack. 



VIII 



To thy bugher and thy skew, 
Filch and gybes I bid adieu, 

Though thy togeman was not new, 
In it the rogue to me was true. 



THE BLACK PROCESSION 37 



THE BLACK PROCESSION 
[1712] 

[From The Triumph of Wit, by J. SHIRLEY : " The 
twenty craftsmen, described by the notorious 
thief-taker Jonathan Wild"]. 



Good people, give ear, whilst a story I tell, 
Of twenty black tradesmen who were brought up 

[in hell, 

On purpose poor people to rob of their due; 
There's none shall be nooz'd if you find but one hun s 

true. 

The first was a coiner, that stampt in a mould; 
The second a voucher to put off his gold. P cotn f 

rr> 11 i_ i ii Look ! be on your 

loure you well; hark you well, see guar d 

Where they are rubb'd, taken 

Up to the nubbing cheat where they are gallows 
nubb'd. 



ii 

mp 



The third was a padder, that fell to decay, p l 

Who used for to plunder upon the highway; 

The fourth was a mill-ken to crack up a door, housebreaker 



38 THE BLACK PROCESSION 

He'd venture to rob both the rich and the poor, 
window thief The fifth was a glazier who when he creeps in, 
valuables To pinch all the lurry he thinks it no sin. 

Toure you well, etc. 

in 
pickpocket; man The sixth is a file-cly that not one cully spares, 

or silly fop 

sneaking-thief The seventh a budge to track softly upstairs; 

accomplice who 

jostles whilst an- The eighth is a bulk, that can bulk any hick, 

other robs 

countryman If the master be nabbed, then the bulk he is 

[sick, 
thief who hooks The ninth is an angler, to lift up a grate 

goods from shop- 
windows if he sees but the lurry his hooks he will bait. 

Toure you well, etc. 

IV 

The tenth is a shop-lift that carries a Bob, 
When he ranges the city, the shops for to rob. 
public-house thief The eleventh a bubber, much used of late; 

Who goes to the ale house, and steals all their 

[plate, 

C m n a ^ d - en goo^- C na- ^he twe ^ tn * s a beau-trap, if a cull he does 
tured> f o1 [meet, 

steals all his He nips all his cole, and turns him into the 

money 

Toure you well, etc. [street. 



[Notes] The thirteenth a famble, false rings for to sell, 
When a mob, he has bit his cole he will tell; 



THE BLACK PROCESSION 39 

The fourteenth a gamester, if he sees the cull an eas y du P e 

[sweet, 

He presently drops down a cog in the street; a lure 

The fifteenth a prancer, whose courage is small, h rs e-tbief 

If they catch him horse-coursing, he's nooz'd once hun s 
Toure you well, etc. [for all. 

VI 

The sixteenth a sheep-napper, whose trade is sheep-steaier 

[so deep, 
If he's caught in the corn, he's marked for a as a duffer 

[sheep ; 
The seventeenth a dunaker, that stoutly makes cattie-iifte 

[vows, 

To go in the country and steal all the cows; 
The eighteenth a kid-napper, who spirits young 

[men, 

Tho' he tips them a pike, they oft nap him again. 
Toure you well, etc. 

VII 

The nineteenth's a prigger of cacklers who harms, poultry-thief 
The poor country higlers, and plunders the farms ; bumpkins 
He steals all their poultry, and thinks it no sin, 
When into the hen-roost, in the night, he gets in ; 
The twentieth's a thief-catcher, so we him call, 
Who if he be nabb'd will be made pay for all. 
Toure you well, etc. 



40 THE BLACK PROCESSION 

[in Bacchus and Venus (1737) an addition- 
al stanza is given: 

VIII 

members of the There's many more craftsmen whom here I could 

Canting Crew 

[name, 

Who use such 'like trades, abandon'd of shame; 
To the number of more than three-score on the 

[whole, 

Who endanger their body, and hazard their soul ; 
And yet, though good workmen, are seldom made 

[free, 

Till they ride in a cart, and be noozed on a tree. 
Toure you well, hark you well, see where they are 

[rubb'd, 
Up to the nubbing cheat, where they are nubb'd. 




FRISKY MOLL'S SONG 



FRISKY MOLL'S SONG 
[1724] 

[By J. HARPER, and sung by Frisky Moll in 
JOHN THURMOND'S Harlequin Sheppard pro- 
duced at Drury Lane Theatre]. 



From priggs that snaffle the prancers strong, 

To you of the Peter Lay, 
I pray now listen a while to my song, 

How my Boman he kick'd away. 



ii 



He broke thro' all rubbs in the whitt, 
And chiv'd his darbies in twain; 

But fileing of a rumbo ken, 

My Boman is snabbled again. 



in 



I Frisky Moll, with my rum coll, 
Wou'd Grub in a bowzing ken; 

But ere for the scran he had tipt the cole, 
The Harman he came in, 



steal horses 
carriage thieves 



fancy man or 
sweetheart 



obstacles ; New- 
gate 
cut : fetters 

Breaking into a 
pawn-broker's 
imprisoned 



good man 

eat ; ale-house 

refreshments ; 
paid 
constable 



42 FRISKY MOLL'S SONG 



IV 

ring; watch; A famble, a tattle, and two popps, 

pistols 

Had my Boman when he was ta'en; 
gin-shops But had he not bouz'd in the diddle shops, 
He'd still been in Drury-Lane. 




THE CANTER'S SERENADE 



43 



THE CANTER 'S SERENADE 
[1725] 

[from The Neiu Canting Dictionary : " Sung early 
in the morning, at the barn doors where 
their doxies have reposed during the night"]. 



[Notes] 



Ye morts and ye dells women ; girls 

Come out of your cells, 
And charm all the palliards about ye; beggars [Notes] 

Here birds of all feathers, 

Through deep roads and all weathers, 
Are gathered together to toute ye. 

ii 

With faces of wallnut, 

And bladder and smallgut, 
We're come scraping and singing to rouse ye; 

Rise, shake off your straw, 

And prepare you each maw mouth 

To kiss, eat, and drink till you're bouzy. drunk, 



44 RETOURE MY DEAR DELL 



[Notes] "RETOUREMYDEAR DELL" 

[1725] 

[From The Neiv Canting Dictionary]. 
I 

night Each darkmans I pass in an old shady grove, 

day ; see And live not the lightmans I toute not my love, 

know well I surtoute every walk, which we used to pass, 

He And couch me down weeping, and kiss the cold 

[grass : 

I cry out on my mort to pity my pain, 
And all our vagaries remember again. 

II 

mistress Didst thou know, my dear doxy, but half of the 

[smart 
heart Which has seized on my panter, since thou didst 

[depart ; 
Didst thou hear but my sighs, my complaining 

[and groans, 
return Thbu'dst surely retoure, and pity my moans: 

Thou'dst give me new pleasure for all my 

[past pain, 
ey el And I should rejoice in thy glaziers again. 



RETOURE MY DEAR DELL 45 



m 

But alas! 'tis my fear that the false Patri-coe hedge-priest 
Is reaping those transports are only my due : 
Retoure, my dear doxy, oh, once more retoure, 
And I'll do all to please thee that lies in my 

[power : 

Then be kind, my dear dell, and pity my pain, 
And let me once more toute thy glaziers again 

IV 

On redshanks and tibs thou shalt every day dine, turkey geese 
And if it should e'er be my hard fate to trine, hang 
I never will whiddle, I never will squeek, speak 

Nor to save my colquarron endanger thy neck, neck 
Then once more, my doxy, be kind and 

[retoure, 

And thou shalt want nothing that lies in my 

[power. 




46 THE VAIN DREAMER 



[Notes] THE VAIN DREAMER. 

[1725] 

[From The New Canting Dictionary]. 



evening Yest darkmans dream'd I of my dell, 

When sleep did overtake her; 

pretty It was a dimber drowsy mort, 

She slept, I durst not wake her. 



ii 



lips Her gans were like to coral red, 

A thousand times I kiss'd 'em; 

stolen A thousand more I might have filch'd' 

She never could have miss'd 'em. 



in 



hair Her strammel, curl'd, like threads of gold, 

Hung dangling o'er the pillow; 
Great pity 'twas that one so prim, 
Should ever wear the willow. 



THE VAIN DREAMER 47 



IV 



I turned down the lilly slat, white sheet 

Methought she fell a screaming, 
This startled me; I straight awak'd, 

And found myself but dreaming. 




48 WHEN MY DIMBER DELL I COURTED 



[Notes] "WHEN MY DIMBER DELL 

I COURTED" 

[1725] 
[From The New Canting Dictionary}. 



pretty wench When my dimber dell I courted 

She had youth and beauty too, 
Wanton joys my heart transported, 
[Notes] And her wap was ever new. 

But conquering time doth now deceive her 

Which her pleasures did uphold ; 
All her wapping now must leave her, 
For, alas! my dell's grown old. 

II 

Her wanton motions which invited, 

Now, alas! no longer charm, 

eyes Her glaziers too are quite benighted, 

Nor can any prig-star charm. 

For conquering time, alas! deceives her 

Which her triumphs did uphold, 
And every moving beauty leaves her 
Alas! my dimber dell's grown old. 



WHEN MY DIMBER DELL I COURTED 49 



in 

There was a time no cull could toute her, man ; look at 

But was sure to be undone: 

Nor could th' uprightman live without her, [Notes] 

She triumph'd over every one. 

But conquering time does now deceive her, 

Which her sporting us'd t' uphold, 
All her am'rous dambers leave her, 
For, alas! the dell's grown old. 

IV 

All thy comfort, dimber dell, 

Is, now, since thou hast lost thy prime, 
That every cull can witness well, 

Thou hast not misus'd thy time. 
There's not a prig or palliard living, 

Who has not been thy slave inroll'd. 

Then cheer thy mind, and cease thy grieving; 

Thou'st had thy time, tho' now grown old. 




50 THE OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 



[Notes] THE OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 

[1749] 

[From The Life of Bampfylde Moore Carezv, by 
ROBERT GOADBY]. 

[Notes] I, Crank Cuffin, swear to be 

True to this fraternity; 

That I will in all obey 

Rule and order of the lay. 
reveal secrets Never blow the gab or squeak ; 
^TnLgLaf* Never snitch to bum or beak; 

But religiously maintain 

Authority of those who reign 
[Notes] Over Stop Hole Abbey green, 

Be their tawny king, or queen. 

In their cause alone will fight; 

Think what they think, wrong or fight; 

Serve them truly, and no other, 

And be faithful to my brother; 

Suffer none, from far or near, 

With their rights to interfere; 
[Notes] No strange Abram, ruffler crack, 

Hooker of another pact, 
[Notes] ; beggar Rogue or rascal, frater, maunderer, 



THE OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 51 

Irish toyle, or other wanderer; [Notes] 

No dimber, dambler, angler, dancer, 

Prig of cackler, prig of prancer; 

No swigman, swaddler, clapper-dudgeon; 

Cadge-gloak, curtal, or curmudgeon ; 

No whip-jack, palliard, patrico; 

No jarkman, be he high or low ; 

No dummerar, or romany; 

No member of the family ; 

No ballad-basket, bouncing buffer, 

Nor any other, will I suffer; 

But stall-off now and for ever 

All outtiers whatsoever; 

And as I keep to the foregone, 

So may help me Salamon! 

By the mass I 




52 COME ALL YOU BUFFERS GAY 




[From The Humourist .... a choice collection of 
songs. 'A New Flash Song', p. 2]. 



rogue or horse- Come all you buffers gay, 

thief 

prowl about That rumly do pad the city, 



^ *. 

Come listen to what I do say, 

And it will make you wond'rous wity. 



ii 



The praps are at Drury Lane, 
And at Covent Garden also, 

Therefore I tell you plain, 

It will not be safe for to go. 



in 



well-dressed vie- But if after a rum cull you pad 

tim ; walk . , 

Pray follow him brave and bold ; 
For many a buffer has been grab'd, 
For fear, as I've been told. 



COME ALL YOU BUFFERS GAY 53 



IV 



Let your pal that follows behind, 

Tip your bulk pretty soon; & ive . , si s" al 

* f J confederate 

And to slap his whip in time, [Notes] 

For fear the cull should be down. 



For if the cull should be down 

And catch you a fileing his bag, robbing. 

Then at the Old Bailey you're found, 

And d m you, he'll tip you the lag. g p rted u *""" 

VI 

But if you should slape his staunch wipe 'gjj. handker - 

Then away to the fence you may go, 
From thence to the ken of one T house 

Where you in full bumpers may flow. 

VII 

But now I have finish'd my rhime, 

And of you all must take my leave ; 
I would have you to leave off in time, 

Or they will make your poor hearts to bleed. 



54 THE POTATO MAN 



[Notes] THE POTATO MAN 

[1775] 

[from Tfie Ranelaugh Concert ... a choice collection 
of the newest songs sung at all the public 
places of entertainment]. 



fellow I am a saucy rolling blade, 

I fear not wet nor dry, 
I keep a jack ass for my trade, 
And thro' the streets do cry 

Chorus. And they all rare potatoes be! 
And they're, etc. 

ii 

mistress A moll I keep that sells fane fruit, 

money [Notes] There's no one brings more cly ; 

She has all things the seasons suit, 
While I my potatoes cry. 

Chorus. And they all, etc. 

in 

cry out A link boy once I stood the gag, 

At Charing Cross did ply, 



THE POTATO MAN 55 

Here's light your honor for a mag, halfpenny 

But now my potatoes cry. 

Chorus. And they all, etc. 

IV 

With a blue bird's eye about my squeeg, handkerchief 

J ^ [Notes] neck. 

And a check shirt on my back, 

A pair of large wedges in my hoofs, 

And an oil skin round my hat. 

Chorus. And they all, etc. 



I'll bait a bull or fight a cock, 

Or pigeons I will fly; 
I'm up to all your knowing rigs smart tricks 

Whilst I my potatoes cry. 

Chorus. And they all, etc. 

VI 

There's five pounds two-pence honest weight 
Your own scales take and try; 

For nibbing Culls I always hate, cheating dealers 

And I in safety cry. 

Chorus. And they all, etc. 



A SLANG PASTORAL 



[Notes] A SLANGPASTORAL 

[1780] 

[By R. TOMLINSON: a Parody on a poem by 
Dr. Byrom, "My time, O ye muses, was 
happily spent"]. 



companions My time, O ye kiddies, was happily spent, 
accompanied When Nancy trigg'd with me wherever I went; 

Ten thousand sweet joys ev'ry night did we prove ; 

Sure never poor fellow like me was in love! 
jailed But since she is nabb'd, and has left me behind, 

What a marvellous change on a sudden I find ! 

When the constable held her as fast as could be, 

I thought 'twas Bet Spriggins; but damme 'twas she. 

ii 

With such a companion, a green-stall to keep, 
drink To swig porter all day, on a flock-bed to sleep, 

ight-hearted I was so good-natur'd, so bobbish and gay, 
And I still was as smart as a carrot all day: 
But now I so saucy and churlish am grown, 
So ragged and greasy, as never was known; 
My Nancy is gone, and my joys are all fled, 
And my arse hangs behind me, as heavy as lead. 



A SLANG PASTORAL 57 



in 



The Kennel, that's wont to run swiftly along, 
And dance to soft murmurs dead kittens among, 
Thou know'st, little buckhorse, if Nancy was there, 
'Twas pleasure to look at, 'twas music to hear : 
But now that she's off, I can see it run past, 
And still as it murmurs do nothing but blast. 
Must you be so cheerful, while I go in pain? 
Stop your clack, and be damn'd t'ye, and hear 

[me complain. 

IV 

When the bugs in swarms round me wou'd often- 

[times play, 

And Nancy and I were as frisky as they, 
We laugh'd at their biting, and kiss'd all the time, 
For the spring of her beauty was just in its prime! 
But now for their frolics I never can sleep, 
So I crack 'em by dozens, as o'er me they creep : 
Curse blight you ! I cry, while I'm all over smart, 
For I'm bit by the arse, while I'm stung to the 

[heart. 



The barber I ever was pleased to see, 

With his paigtail come scraping to Nancy and me; 

And Nancy was pleas'd too, and to the man said, 



5 8 A SLANG PASTORAL 

Come hither, young fellow, and frizzle my head: 
But now when he's bowing, I up with my stick, 
Cry, blast you, you scoundrel ! and give him a kick 
And I'll lend him another, for why should not John 
Be as dull as poor Dermot, when Nancy is gone ? 

VI 

When sitting with Nancy, what sights have I seen ! 
How white was the turnep, the col'wart how green ! 
What a lovely appearance, while under the shade, 
The carrot, the parsnip, the cauliflow'r made! 
picks oakum But now she mills doll, tho' the greens are still there 
They none of 'em half so delightful appear: 
It was not the board that was nail'd to the wall, 
Made so many customers visit our stall. 

VII 

Sweet music went with us both all the town thro', 
[Notes] To Bagnigge, White Conduit, and Sadler's-Wells 

[too; 
Soft murmur'd the Kennels, the beau-pots how 

[sweet, 

And crack went the cherry-stones under our feet : 
gone But now she to Bridewell has punch'd it along, 

My eye, Betty Martin! on music a song: 
'Twas her voice crying mack'rel, as now I have 

[found, 
Gave ev'ry-thing else its agreeable sound. 



A SLANG PASTORAL 59 



VIII 

Gin! What is become of thy heart-chearing fire, 
And where is the beauty of Calvert's Intire? 
Does aught of its taste Double Gloucester beguile, 
That ham, those potatoes, why do they not smile, 
Ah! rot ye, I see what it was you were at, 
Why you knocked up your froth, why you flash'd 

[off your fat: 

To roll in her ivory, to pleasure her eye, 
To be tipt by her tongue, on her stomach to lie. 

IX 

How slack is the crop till my Nancy return ! 

No duds in my pocket, no sea-coal to burn! money 

Methinks if I knew where the watchman wou'd 

[tread, 

I wou'd follow, and lend him a punch o' the head. 
Fly swiftly, good watchman, bring hither my dear, 
And, blast me! I'll tip ye a gallon of beer. treat 

Ah, sink him! the watchman is full of delay, 
Nor will budge one foot faster for all I can say. 



Will no blood-hunting foot-pad, that hears me 

[complain, 

Stop the wind of ; that nabbing-cull, constable [Notes] 

[Payne ? 



6o A SLANG PASTORAL 

If he does, he'll to Tyburn next sessions be dragg'd, 
foolish And what kiddy's so rum as to get himself 

[scragg'd ? 

No! blinky, discharge her, and let her return; 
For ne'er was poor fellow so sadly forlorn. 
Zounds ! what shall I do ? I shall die in a ditch ; 
Take warning by me how you're leagu'd with a 

[bitch. 







YE SCAMPS, YE PADS, YE DIVERS 61 



YE SCAMPS, YE PADS, YE DIVERS 
[1781] 

[From The Choice of Harlequin : or The Indian 
Chief by MR. MESSINK, and sung by JOHN 
EDWIN as "the Keeper of Bridewell"]. 



Ye scamps, ye pads, ye divers, and all upon fo< ^kfts-[No 

[the lay, 
In Tothill-fields gay sheepwalk, like lambs ye sport To ?|' fields 

[and play; 

Rattling up your darbies, come hither at my call ; 
I'm jigger dubber here, and you are welcome warder; 

[tO mill doll. pick oakum 

With my tow row, etc. 
ii 

At your insurance office the flats you've taken in, 
The game they've play'd, my kiddy, you're always 

[sure to win; 
First you touch the shiners the number up money 

[you break, 

With your insuring-policy, I'd not insure your neck. 
With my tow row, etc. 



62 YE SCAMPS, YE PADS, YE DIVERS 

in 

feet The French, with trotters nimble, could fly from 

[English blows, 
fist And they've got nimble daddies, as monsieur 

[plainly shews; 
Be thus the foes of Britain bang'd, ay, thump 

[away, monsieur, 
The hemp you're beating now will make your 

[solitaire. 
With my tow row, etc. 

IV 

eyes My peepers! who've we here now? why this is 

[sure Black-Moll: 
My ma'am, you're of the fair sex, so welcome 

[to mill doll; 
common lodging- The cull with you who'd venture into a snoozing-ken, 

house 

[Notes] Like Blackamore Othello, should "put out the 

[light and then. " 
With my tow row, etc. 

v 

I think my flashy coachman, that you'll take better 

[care, 

drink ; abuse ]sj or f or a jj tt j e fafo come the slang upon your fare ; 
wig; "footing" Your jazy pays the garnish, unless the fees you tip, 
Though you're a flashy coachman, here the 
[gagger holds the whip, 
With my tow row, etc. 



YE SCAMPS, YE PADS, YE DIVERS 63 

Chorus omnes 

We're scamps, we're pads, we're divers, we're all 

[upon the lay, 
In Tothill-fields gay sheepwalk, like lambs we sport 

[and play; 

Rattling up our darbies, we're hither at your call, 
You're jigger dubber here, and we're forc'd for 

[to mill doll. 
With my tow row, etc. 




64 THE SANDMAN'S WEDDING 



[Notes] THE SANDMAN'S WEDDING 

[b. 1789] 

[A Cantata by G. Parker (?)]. 
Recitative. 

As Joe the sandman drove his noble team 
Of raw-rump'd jennies, " Sand-ho ! " was his theme : 
street j us t as he turned the corner of the drum, 

rag-gatherer jjj s dear lov'd Bess, the bunter, chanc'd to come; 
With joy cry'd " Woa", did turn his quid and stare, 
kissed her -pirst suck'd her jole, then thus addressed the fair. 

Air. 

i 

Forgive me if I praise those charms 
eyes Thy glaziers bright, lips, neck, and arms 

Thy snowy bubbies e'er appear 
Like two small hills of sand, my dear : 
Thy beauties, Bet, from top to toe 
Have stole the heart of Sandman Joe. 

ii 

Come wed, my dear, and let's agree, 
aie-housa Then of the booze-ken you'll be free; 



THE SANDMAN'S WEDDING 65 

No sneer from cully, mot, or froe fellow, girl, or 

Dare then reproach my Bess for Joe; 

For he's the kiddy rum and queer, ' brave and cute 

That all St. Giles's boys do fear 

Recitative, 

With daylights flashing, Bess at length reply'd, eyes 

Must Joey proffer this, and be deny'd ? 

No, no, my Joe shall have his heart delight 

And we'll be wedded ere we dorse this night; sleep 

"Well lipp'd," quoth Joe, " no more you need to spoken 

[say" 
11 Gee-up ! gallows, do you want my sand to-day ? " 

Air. 



money 



Joe sold his sand, and cly'd his cole, sir, pocketed 

While Bess got a basket of rags, 
Then up to St. Giles's they roll'd, sir, 

To every bunter Bess brags: 
Then into a booze-ken they pike it, 

Where Bess was admitted we hear; 
For none of the coves dare but like it, 

As Joey, her kiddy, was there. 

ii 

Full of glee, until ten that they started, 
For supper Joe sent out a win ; 

5 



66 THE SANDMAN'S WEDDING 

A hog's maw between them was parted, 
And after they sluic'd it with gin: 

It was on an old leather trunk, sir, 

They married were, never to part; 

But Bessy, she being blind drunk, sir, 
Joe drove her away in his cart. 







THE HAPPY PAIR 67 



THE HAPPY PAIR. 
[1789] 

[By GEORGE PARKER in Life's Painter of Variegated 
Characters}. 

Joe. 

Ye slang-boys all, since wedlock's nooze, 

Together fast has tied 
Moll Blabbermums and rowling Joe, 

Each other's joy and pride; 
Your broomsticks and tin kettles bring, [Notes] 

With cannisters and stones: 
Ye butchers bring your cleavers too, 

Likewise your marrow-bones; 
For ne'er a brace in marriage hitch'd, 

By no one can be found, 
That's half so blest as Joe and Moll, 

Search all St. Giles's round. 

Moll. 

Though fancy queer-gamm'd smutty Muns 

Was once my fav'rite man, 
Though rugged-muzzle tink'ring Tom 

For me left maw-mouth'd Nan: 



68 THE HAPPY PAIR 

tramping; pick- Though padding Jack and diving Ned, 

pickpocket With blink-ey'd buzzing Sam, 

paid for Have made me drunk with hot, and stood 

The racket for a dram; 
Though Scamp the ballad-singing kid, 
woman, girl Call'd me his darling frow, 

jilted I've tip'd them all the double, for 

The sake of rowling Joe. 

Chorus. 

Therefore, in jolly chorus now, 
Let's chaunt it altogether, 

man; woman And let each cull's and doxy's heart 
Be lighter than a feather; 

money And as the kelter runs quite flush, 

Like natty shining kiddies, 

whores To treat the coaxing, giggling brims, 

spirit; spend our With spunk let's post our neddies\ 

guineas 

drink: food Then we'll all roll in bub and grub, 

drinking-hoase Till from this ken we go, 

Since rowling Joe's tuck'd up with Moll, 
And Moll's tuck'd up with Joe. 




THE BUNTER'S CHRISTENING 69 



THE BUNTER'S CHRISTENING 
[1789] 

[By GEORGE PARKER in Life's Painter of Variegated 
Characters]. 



Bess Tatter, of Hedge- lane, 

To ragman Joey's joy, 
The cull with whom she snooz'd man 

Brought forth a chopping boy: 
Which was, as one might say, 

The moral of his dad, sir; 
And at the christ'ning oft, 

A merry bout they had, sir. 

ii 

For, when 'twas four weeks old, 

Long Ned, and dust-cart Chloe, 
To give the kid a name, 

Invited were by Joey; 
With whom came muzzy Tom, muddied 

And sneaking Snip, the boozer, drunkard 

Bag-picking, blear-ey'd Ciss, 

And squinting Jack, the bruiser. pugilist 



70 THE BUNTER'S CHRISTENING 



in 



Likewise came bullying Sam, 

With cat's-and-dog's-meat Nelly, 

Young Smut, the chimney-sweep, 
And smiling snick-snack Willy; 

Peg Swig and Jenny Gog, 
harlots; thievish The brims, with birdlime fingers, 

Brought warbling, seedy Dick, 
The prince of ballad-singers. 



IV 



The guests now being met, 

The first thing that was done, sir, 

Was handling round the kid, 

kiss him That all might smack his muns, sir ; 

drop of gin A flash of lightning next, 

gave; man; B ess tint each Cull and frow, sir, 

woman 

walk E re th e y to church did pad, 



To have it christen'd Joe, sir. 



Away they then did trudge; 

But such a queer procession, 
Of seedy brims and kids, 

Is far beyond expression. 






THE_BUNTER'S CHRISTENING 71 

The christ'ning being o'er, 

They back again soon pik't it, went 

To have a dish of lap, tea 

Prepar'd for those who lik't it. 

VI 

Bung all come back once more 

They slobber'd little Joey; kissed 

Then, with some civil jaw, words 

Part squatted, to drink bohea, 

And part swig'd barley swipes, drank beer 

As short-cut they were smoaking, tobacco 

While some their patter flash'd talked 

In gallows fun and joking. screaming 

VII 

For supper, Joey stood, 

To treat these curious cronies; 
A bullock's melt, hog's maw 

Sheep's heads, and stale polonies : 
And then they swill'd gin-hot, 

Until blind drunk as Chloe, 
At twelve, all bundled from 

The christ'ning of young Joey. 



72 THE MASQUERADERS: 



[Notes] THE MASQUERADERS: OR, THE WORLD 

AS IT WAGS 

[1789] 

[By GEORGE PARKER in Lifers Painter of Variegated 
Characters^ 

I 

Ye flats, sharps, and rum ones, who make up 

[this pother; 
Who gape and stare, just like stuck pigs at 

[each other, 

As mirrors, wherein, at full length do appear, 
Your follies reflected so apish and queer 

Tol de rol, etc. 

ii 

Attend while I sings, how, in ev'ry station, 
Masquerading is practised throughout ev'ry nation : 
Some mask for mere pleasure, but many we know, 
money To lick in the rhino, false faces will show. 

Tol de rol, etc. 

in 

Twig counsellors jabb'ring 'bout justice and law, 
bribing Cease greasing their fist and they'll soon cease 

[their jaw; 



OR, THE WORLD AS IT WAGS 73 

And patriots, 'bout freedom will kick up a riot, 
Till their ends are all gain'd, and their jaws then 

[are quiet. 
Tol de rol, etc. 

IV 

Twig methodist phizzes, with mask sanctimonious, See 
Their rigs prove to judge that their phiz is methods 

[erroneous. 

Twig lank-jaws, the miser, that skin-flint old elf, 
From his long meagre phiz, who'd think he'd 

[the pelf. 
Tol de rol, etc. 



Twig levees, they're made up of time- sarving faces, 
With fawning and flatt'ring for int'rest and places ; 
And ladies appear too at court and elsewhere, 
In borrow'd complexions, false shapes, and false hair. 

Tol de rol, etc. 

VI 

Twig clergyman but as there needs no more proof 
My chaunt I concludes, and shall now pad the hoof; walk away 
So nobles and gents, lug your counterfeits out, 
I'll take brums or cut ones, and thank you to boot. 

Tol de rol, etc, 



74 THE FLASH MAN OF ST. GILES 



[Notes] THE FLASH MAN OF ST. GILES 

[b. 1790] 

[From The Busy Bee]. 



[Notes] I was a flash man of St. Giles, 

And I fell in love with Nelly Stiles; 

walked And I padded the hoof for many miles 

To show the strength of my flame: 
In the Strand, and at the Admiralty, 

victims She pick'd up the flats as they pass'd by, 

stole handker- 
chiefs; side And I milld their wipes from their side clye, 

And then sung fal de ral tit, tit fal de ral, 
Tit fal de ree, and then sung fal de ral tit! 

ii 

girl, whore The first time I saw the flaming rnot, 

Was at the sign of the Porter Pot, 
I call'd for some purl, and we had it hot, 
With gin and bitters too ! 
talking noisily We threw off our slang at high and low, 

And we were resolv'd to breed a row 
[Notes] For we both got as drunk as David's sow, 
And then sung fal de ral tit, etc. 



THE FLASH MAN OF ST. GILES 75 



in 

As we were roaring forth a catch, 
('Twas twelve o'clock) we wak'd the watch, 
I at his jazy made a snatch, w ig 

And try'd for to nab his rattle! steal 

But I miss'd my aim and down I fell, 
And then he charg'd both me and Nell, 
And bundled us both to St. Martin's cell 
Where we sung fal de ral tit, etc. 

IV 

We pass'd the night in love away, 
And 'fore justice H we went next day, 
And because we could not three hog pay, shilling 

Why we were sent to quod ! prison 

In quod we lay three dismal weeks, 
Till Nell with crying swell'd her cheeks, 
And I damn'd the quorum all for sneaks 
And then sung fal de ral tit, etc. 



From Bridewell bars we now are free, 
And Nell and I so well agree, 
That we live in perfect harmony, 

And grub and bub OUr fill ! eat and drink 

For we have mill'd a precious go made a rich haul 

And queer'd the flats at thrums, E, O, 



76 THE FLASH MAN OF ST. GILES 

Every night in Titmouse Row, 

Where we sing fal de ral tit, etc. 



VI 



All you who live at your wit's end, 
Unto this maxim pray attend, 
Never despair to find a friend, 
While flats have bit aboard! 
For Nell and I now keep a gig, 
And look so grand, so flash and big, 

every ^ e ro ^ * n everv knowing rig 

While we sing fal de ral tit, etc. 




A LEARY MOT 77 



A LEARY MOT t Notes l 

[c. 1811] 

[A broadside ballad]. 

i 
Rum old Mog was a leary flash mot, and woman or harlot 

she was round and fat, 
With twangs in her shoes, a wheelbarrow too, and 

an oilskin round her hat; 
A blue bird's-eye o'er dairies fine-as she mizzled S an fNotes] ; 

through Temple Bar, paps ; went 

Of vich side of the way, I cannot say, but she 

boned it from a Tar stole 

Singing, tol-lol-lol-lido. 

ii 

Now Moll's flash com-pan-ion was a Chick-lane sweetheart 

gill, and he garter'd below his knee, 
He had twice been pull'd, and nearly lagg'd, g *S trans " 

but got off by going to sea; 
With his pipe and quid, and chaunting voice, 

" Potatoes ! " he would cry ; 
For he valued neither cove nor swell, for he 

had wedge snug in his cly money; pocket 

Singing, tol-lol-lol-lido. 



/8 A LEARY MOT 

in 
[Notes] One night they went to a Cock-and-Hen Club, 

at the sign of the Mare and Stallion, 
But such a sight was never seen as Mog and her 

flash com- pan-ion; 
Wssed Her covey was an am'rous blade, and he buss'd 

young Bet on the sly, 
fist; straight to When Mog up with her daddle, bang-up to the 

the spot 

rag-gatherer mark, and she black'd the Bunter's eye. 

Singing, tol-lol-lol-lido. 

IV 

Now this brought on a general fight, Lord, what 

great shindy a gallows TOW 

With whacks and thumps throughout the night, 
[Notes] till " drunk as David's sow"- 

fighting Milling up and down with cut heads, and lots 

of broken ribs, 

But the lark being over they ginned themselves 
at jolly Tom Cribb's. 

Singing, tol-lol-lol-lido. 




THE DEATH OF SOCRATES 79 



"THE NIGHT BEFORE LARRY 
WAS STRETCHED" 

[c. 1816] 



The night before Larry was stretch' d, 

The boys they all paid him a visit; 
A bit in their sacks, too, they fetch'd 

They sweated their duds till they riz it; p c a t n h e e d s their 
For Larry was always the lad, 

When a friend was condemn'd to the squeezer, gallows or rop 
But he'd pawn all the togs that he had, clothes 

Just to help the poor boy to a sneezer, drink 

And moisten his gob 'fore he died. 



ii 



"Pon my conscience, dear Larry', says I, 

'I'm sorry to see you in trouble, 
And your life's cheerful noggin run dry, 

And yourself going off like its bubble ! ' 
' Hould your tongue in that matter, ' says he ; 

'For the neckcloth I don't care a button, halter 
And by this time to-morrow you'll see 



8o THE DEATH OF SOCRATES 

Your Larry will be dead as mutton: 

All for what ? ' Kase his courage was 

[good ! ' 

in 

The boys they came crowding in fast; 

They drew their stools close round about him, 
candies Six glims round his coffin they placed 

He couldn't be well waked without 'em, 
I ax'd if he was fit to die, 

Without having duly repented? 
Says Larry, 'That's all in my eye, 
And all by the clargy invented, 

To make a fat bit for themselves. 

IV 

Then the cards being called for, they play'd, 

Till Larry found one of them cheated ; 
Quick he made a hard rap at his head 

The lad being easily heated, 
'So ye chates me bekase I'm in grief! 

O! is that, by the Holy, the rason? 
Soon I'll give you to know you d d thief! 

That you're cracking your jokes out of sason, 
And scuttle your nob with my fist 7 . 



Then in came the priest with his book 

He spoke him so smooth and so civil; 



THE DEATH OF SOCRATES 81 

Larry tipp'd him a Kilmainham look, [Notes] 

And pitch'd his big wig to the devil. 
Then raising a little his head, 

To get a sweet drop of the bottle, 
And pitiful sighing he said, 

' O ! the hemp will be soon round my throttle, 
And choke my poor windpipe to death ! ' 

VI 

So mournful these last words he spoke, 

We all vented our tears in a shower; 
For my part, I thought my heart broke 

To see him cut down like a flower! 
On his travels we watch'd him next day, 

O, the hangman I thought I could kill him ! 
Not one word did our poor Larry say, 

Nor chang'd till he came to King William; [Notes] 

Och, my dear ! then his colour turned white. 

VII 

When he came to the nubbing-cheat, 

He was tack'd up so neat and so pretty ; 
The rumbler jugg'd off from his feet, cart 

And he died with his face to the city. 
He kick'd too, but that was all pride, 

For soon you might see 'twas all over; 
And as soon as the nooze was untied, 

Then at darkey we waked him in clover, ^ight 

And sent him to take a ground-sweat, buried him 

6 



82 THE SONG OF THE YOUNG PRIG 



[Notes] THE SONG OF THE YOUNG PRIG 

(c. 1819] 



[Notes] My mother she dwelt in Dyot's Isle, 
One of the canting crew, sirs ; 

Deggtirb 

And if you'd know my father's style, 
He was the Lord-knows-who, sirs! 

I first held horses in the street, 
But being found defaulter, 

hackney-coach Turned rumbler's flunkey for my meat, 
So was brought up to the halter. 

pick a pocket; lay 

hold of notes or Frisk the cly, and fork the rag, 

money 

steal handker- Draw the fogies plummy, 

chiefs desirously , 

steal a watch; Speak to the rattles, bag the swag, 

pocket the plun- 
der And finely hunt the dummy. 

steal pocket- 
books. 

II 

My name they say is young Birdlime, 

My fingers are fish-hooks, sirs; 
[Notes] And I my reading learnt betime, 

From studying pocket-books, sirs; 

attended rob- j haye & gweet QyQ for & p j antj 



THE SONG OF THE YOUNG PRIG 83 

And graceful as I amble, 
Finedraw a coat-tail sure I can't 

So kiddy is my famble. skilful is my hand 

Chorus. Frisk the cly, etc. 

in 

A night bird oft I'm in the cage, lock-up 

But my rum-chants ne'er fail, sirs; 

The dubsman's senses to engage, gaoler 

While I tip him leg-bail, sirs ; run away 
There's not, for picking, to be had, 

A lad so light and larky, frolicsome 

The cleanest angler on the pad expert pickpocket 

In daylight or the darkey. night 
Chorus. Frisk the cly, etc. 

IV 

And though I don't work capital, [Notes] 

And do not weigh my weight, sirs; 
Who knows but that in time I shall, 

For there's no queering fate, sirs. getting the better 

If I'm not lagged to Virgin-nee, [KT* 

I may a Tyburn show be, be hanged 

Perhaps a tip-top cracksman be, housebreaker 

Or go on the high toby. b n* high ' 
Chorus. Frisk the cly, etc. 



84 THE MILLING-MATCH 



[Notes] THE MILLING-MATCH 

[1819] 

[By THOMAS MOORE in Tom Crib's Memorial to 
Congress: "Account of the Milling-match 
between Entellus and Dares, translated from 
the Fifth Book of the ^Eneid by One of the 
Fancy "J. 

hands; head With daddies high upraised, and nob held back, 
In awful prescience of the impending thwack, 

'yiungfeiiows 117 Both ki ddies stood-and with prelusive spar, 
And light manoeuvring, kindled up the war! 
The One, in bloom of youth a light-weight 

[blade - 
The Other, vast, gigantic, as if made, 

pugilism Express, by Nature, for the hammering trade; 

But aged, slow, with stiff limbs, tottering much, 
And lungs, that lack'd the bellows-mender's touch. 

men Yet, sprightly to the scratch, both Buffers came, 

While ribbers rung from each resounding frame, 
And divers digs, and many a ponderous pelt, 

stomachs Were on their broad bread-baskets heard and felt. 

With roving aim, but aim that rarely miss'd 

ears and eyes Round lugs and ogles flew the frequent fist ; 



THE MILLING-MATCH 85 

While showers of facers told so deadly well, 

That the crush'd jaw-bones crackled as they fell! 

But firmly stood Entellus and still bright, 

Though bent by age, with all the Fancy's light, I Notes l 

Stopp'd with a skill, and rallied with a fire 

The immortal Fancy could alone inspire! 

While Dares, shifting round, with looks of thought. 

An opening to the cove's huge carcass sought 

(Like General Preston, in that awful hour, 

When on one leg he hopp'd to take the Tower!), 

And here, and there, explored with active fin, 

And skilful feint, some guardless pass to win, 

And prove a boring guest when once let in. 

Arid now Entellus, with an eye that plann'd 
Punishing deeds, high raised his heavy hand ; 
But ere the sledge came down, young Dares spied 
Its shadow o'er his brow, and slipped aside 
So nimbly slipp'd, that the vain nobber pass'd 
Through empty air; and He, so high, so vast, 
Who dealt the stroke, came thundering to the 

[ground! 

Not B ck gh m himself, with balkier sound, 
Uprooted from the field of Whiggist glories, 
Fell souse, of late, among the astonish'd Tories! 
Instant the ring was broke, and shouts and yells 
From Trojan Flashmen and Sicilian Swells 
Fill'd the wide heaven while, touch'd with grief 

[to see 



86 THE MILLING-MATCH 

friend ; frolic His pall, well-known through many a lark and spree, 

heavily Thus rumly floor'd, the kind Ascestes ran, 

And pitying rais'd from earth the game old man. 
Uncow'd, undamaged to the sport he came, 
His limbs all muscle, and his soul all flame. 

fighting The memory of his milling glories past, 

The shame that aught but death should see him 

[grass'd. 

All fired the veteran's pluck with fury flush'd, 
Full on his light-limb'd customer he rush'd, 

dealing blows And hammering right and left, with ponderous 

[swing 

Ruffian'd the reeling youngster round the ring 
Nor rest, nor pause, nor breathing-time was given 
But, rapid as the rattling hail from heaven 
Beats on the house-top, showers of Randall's shot 
Around the Trojan's lugs fell peppering hot! 
'Till now /Eneas, fill'd with anxious dread, 
Rush'd in between them, and, with words well- 

[bred, 

Preserved alike the peace and Dares' head, 
Both which the veteran much inclined to break 
Then kindly thus the punish'd youth bespake : 
" Poor Johnny Raw ! what madness could impel 
So rum a Flat to face so prime a Swell? 
See'st thou not, boy, the Fancy, heavenly maid, 
Herself descends to this great Hammerer's aid, 
And, singling him from all her flash adorers, 






THE MILLING-MATCH 87 

Shines in his hits, and thunders in his floorers? 
Then, yield thee, youth, nor such a spooney be, 
To think mere man can mill a Deity ! " 

Thus spoke the chief and now, the scrimmage 

[o'er, 

His faithful pals the done-up Dares bore 
Back to his home, with tottering gams, sunk heart, 
And muns and noddle pink'd in every part. 
While from his gob the guggling claret gush'd blood 
And lots of grinders, from their sockets crush'd teeth 
Forth with the crimson tide in rattling fragments 

[rush'd ! 




88 YA-HIP, MY HEARTIES! 



[Notes] YA-HIP, MY HEARTIES! 

[1819] 

[From MOORE'S Tom Crib" 1 s Memorial to Congress: 
" Sung by Jack Holmes, the Coachman, at 
a late Masquerade in St Giles's, in the 
character of Lord C st e on . . . This 
song which was written for him by Mr. 
Gregson, etc."]. 



drive a hackney- j g rs t was hired to peg a Hack 

coach 

They call "The Erin" sometime back, 
talk slang Where soon I learned to patter flash, 

horses ; whip To curb the tits, and tip the lash 

Which pleased the Master of The Crown 
So much, he had me up to town, 
money And gave me lots of quids a year, 

drive To tool " The Constitutions " here. 

So, ya-hip, hearties, here am I 
That drive the Constitution Fly. 

ii 

Some wonder how the Fly holds out, 
So rotten 'tis, within, without; 



YA-HIP, MY HEARTIES! 89 

So loaded too, through thick and thin, 
And with such heavy creturs IN. 
But, Lord, 't will last our time or if 
The wheels should, now and then, get stiff, 
Oil of Palm's the thing that, flowing, money. 

Sets the naves and felloes going. 
So ya-hip, Hearties I etc. 

in 

Some wonder, too, the tits that pull 
This rum concern along, so full, 
Should never back or bolt, or kick 
The load and driver to Old Nick. 
But, never fear, the breed, though British, 
Is now no longer game or skittish; 
Except sometimes about their corn, 

Tamer Houghnhums ne'er were born. [Notes] 

So, ya-hip, Hearties, etc. 

IV 

And then so sociably we ride! 
While some have places, snug, inside, 
Some hoping to be there anon. 
Through many a dirty road hang on. 
And when we reach a filthy spot 
(Plenty of which there are, God wot), 
You'd laugh to see with what an air 
We take the spatter each his share. 
So, ya-hip, Hearties^ etc. 



90 SONNETS FOR THE FANCY 



[Notes] SONNETS FOR THE FANCY: 

AFTER THE MANNER OF PETRARCH 

[c. 1824] 

[From Boxiana, iii. 621. 622]. 
Education. 

A link-boy once, Dick Hellfinch stood the grin, 

At Charing Cross he long his toil apply'd; 
penny "Here light, here light! your honours for a win," 

man; woman To every cull and drab he loudly cried. 

In Leicester Fields, as most the story know, 
half-penny " Come black your worship for a single mag," 

spent the money And while he shin'd his Nelly suck'd the bag, 
made a lot of And thus they sometimes stagg'd a precious go. 
In Smithfield, too, where graziers' flats resort, 
He loiter'd there to take in men of cash, 

With cards and dice was up to ev'ry sport, 
And at Saltpetre Bank would cut a dash ; 
cute fellow A very knowing rig in ev'ry gang, 

[i.e. fraternity] Dick Hellfinch was the pick of all the slang. 

Progress. 

His Nell sat on Newgate steps, and scratch'd 

[her poll, 

Her eyes suffus'd with tears, and bung'd 

[with gin ; 



SONNETS FOR THE FANCY 91 

The Session's sentence wrung her to the soul, 
Nor could she lounge the gag to shule a win ; 
The knowing bench had tipp'd her buzer queer, sentenced the 

pick-pocket 

For Dick had beat the hoof upon the pad, 
Of Field, or Chick-lane was the boldest lad 

That ever mill'd the cly, or roll'd the leer. picked pockets 

And with Nell he kept a lock, to fence, and tuz, 

And while his flaming mot was on the lay, 
With rolling kiddies, Dick would dive and buz, 

And cracking kens concluded ev'ry day; burgling 

But fortune fickle, ever on the wheel, 
Turn'd up a rubber, for these smarts to feel. 

Triumph. 

Both'ring the flats assembled round the quod, goal 

The queerum queerly smear'd with dirty black ; gallows 
The dolman sounding, while the sheriff's nod, 

Prepare the switcher to dead book the whack, 
While in a rattle sit two blowens flash, coach; women 

Salt tears fast streaming from each bungy eye ; 

To nail the ticker, or to mill the cly stcal a watch ' 

pick a pocket 

Through thick and thin their busy muzzlers splash, 
The mots lament for Tyburn's merry roam, 

That bubbl'd prigs must at the New Drop fall, Newgate 
And from the start the scamps are cropp'd at 

[home; 

All in the sheriff's picture frame the call hangman's noose 

Exalted high, Dick parted with his flame, 
And all his comrades swore that he dy'd game. 



92 THE TRUE BOTTOM'D BOXER 



[Notes] THE TRUE BOTTOM'D BOXER 

[1825] 

[By J. JONES in Universal Songster, ii. 96]. 
Air: "Oh! nothing in life can sadden us." 



[Notes] Spring's the boy for a Moulsey-Hurst rig, my lads, 

Shaking a flipper, and milling a pate; 
Fibbing a nob is most excellent gig, my lads, 
Kneading the dough is a turn-out in state. 
Tapping the claret to him is delighting, 
Belly-go-firsters and clicks of the gob; 
For where are such joys to be found as in fighting, 

And measuring mugs for a chancery job: 
With flipping and milling, and fobbing and nob- 

[bing, 

With belly-go-firsters arid kneading the dough, 

With tapping of claret, and clipping and gobbing, 

Say just what you please, you must own he's 

the go. 

ii 

Spring's the boy for flooring and flushing it, 
Hitting and stopping, advance and retreat, 



THE TRUE BOTTOM'D BOXER 93 

For taking and giving, for sparring and rushing it, 
And will ne'er say enough, till he's down right 

[dead beat; 

No crossing for him, true courage and bottom all, 

You'll find him a rum un, try on if you can; 

You shy-cocks, he shows 'em no favour, 'od rot 

['em all, 

When he fights he trys to accomplish his man; 

With giving and taking, and flooring and flushing, 

With hitting and stopping, huzza to the ring, 

With chancery suiting, and sparring and rushing, 

He's the champion of fame, and of manhood 

[the spring. 

in 

Spring's the boy for rum going and coming it, 

Smashing and dashing, and tipping it prime, 
Eastward and westward, and sometimes back- 

[slumming it, 

He's for the scratch, and come up too in time ; 
For the victualling-office no favor he'll ask it, 

For smeller and ogles he feels just the same; 
At the pipkin to point, or upset the bread-basket, 

He's always in twig, and bang-up for the game ; 
With going and tipping, and priming and timing 

'Till groggy and queery, straight- forwards the rig; 
With ogles and smellers, no piping and chiming, 

You'll own he's the boy that is always in twig. 



94 BOBBY AND HIS MARY 



[Notes] BOBBY AND HIS MARY 

[1826] 

[From Universal Songster, iii. io8J. 

Tune Dulce Domum. 

I 
[Notes]- ale-house In Dyot-strcet a. booze-ken stood, 

Oft sought by foot-pads weary, 
And long had been the blest abode 

Of Bobby, and his Mary, 
walk around For her he'd nightly pad the hoof, 

rob passers-by And gravel tax Collect 

For her he never shammed the snite. 
police Though traps tried to detect him; 

When darkey came he sought his home 
girl While she, distracted blowen 

She hailed his sight, 
And, ev'ry night 
The booze-ken rung 
As they sung, 
O, Bobby and his Mary. 

ii 

But soon this scene of cozey fuss 

Was changed to prospects queering 



BOBBY AND HIS MARY 95 

The blunt ran shy, and Bobby brush'd, money; went off 

To get more rag not fearing ; notes or gold 

To Islington he quickly hied, 

A traveller there he dropped on; 
The traps were fly, his rig they spied object 

And ruffles soon they popped on. handcuffs 

When evening came, he sought not home, 
While she, poor stupid woman, 

Got lushed that night, drunk 

Oh, saw his sprite, 
Then heard the knell 
That bids farewell ! 
Then heard the knell 

Of St. Pulchre's bell ! [Notes] 

Now he dangles on the Common. 




96 FLASHEY JOE 



[Notes] FLASHEY JOE 

[1826] 

[By R. MORLEY in Universal Songster, ii. 194]. 



As Flashey Joe one day did pass 

Through London streets, so jolly, 

A crying fish, he spied a lass 

'Twas Tothill's pride, sweet Molly! 
mouth; silk hand- [ e w ip'd his mug with bird's-eye blue 

kerchief [Notes] 

kiss He cried, " Come, buss your own dear Joe "; 

She turned aside, alas! 'tis true 

And bawled out " Here's live mackerel, O ! 
Four a shilling, mackerel, O ! 
All alive, O! 
New mackerel, O." 

ii 

talk like that Says I,-"Miss Moll, don't tip this gam, 

You knows as how it will not do; 
fought For you I milled flash Dustman Sam 

eyes Who made your peepers black and blue. 

Vhy, then you swore you would be kind 
acted strangely But you have queer'd so much of late, 



FLASHEY JOE 97 

And always changing like the wind, 

So now I'll brush and sell my skate." be off 

Buy my skate, etc. 

in 

She blubb'd "Now, Joe, vhy treat me ill? 

You know I love you as my life! 
When I forsook both Sam and Will, 

And promised to become your wife, 

YOU moiled it Up with Brick-dust Sail took as a mistress 

And went to live with her in quod ! gaol 

So I'll pike off with my mack'ral walk 

And you may bolt with your salt cod." 
Here's mack'rel, etc. 

IV 

I could not part with her, d'ye see 

So I tells Moll to stop her snivel; crying 

"Your panting bubs and glist'ning eye paps 

Just make me love you like the divil." 
"Vhy, then," says she, "come tip's your dad, shake hands 

And let us take a drap of gin, 
And may I choke with hard-roed shad 

If I forsake my Joe Herring." 
Four a shilling, etc. 



98 MY MUGGING MAID 



[Notes] MY MUGGING MAID 

[1826] 

[By JAMES BRUTON. Universal Songster, iii. 103]. 
i 

Why lie ye in that ditch, so snug, 
[Notes] With s and filth bewrayed 

ear With hair all dangling down thy lug 

My mugging maid? 

II 

tongue Say, mugging Moll, why that red-rag 

Which oft hath me dismayed, 
speech Why is it now so mute in mag, 

My mugging maid ? 

ill 

drink Why steals the booze down through thy snout, 

With mulberry's blue arrayed, 
And why from throat steals hiccough out 

My mugging maid? 

IV 

mouth Why is thy mug so wan and blue, 

In mud and muck you're laid; 



MY MUGGING MAID 99 

Say, what's the matter now with you 

My mugging maid ? 



The flask that in her fam appeared hand 

The snore her conk betrayed, nose 

Told me, that Hodge's max had queered [Notes]; got the 

better of 

My mugging maid. 




ioo POOR LUDDY 



[Notes] POOR LUDDY 

[b. 1826] 

[By T. DIBDIN. Universal Songster, Vol. iii]. 

As I was walking down the Strand, 

Luddy, Luddy, 
Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 
As I was walking down the Strand, 
police ; arrested The traps they nabbed me out of hand 

Luddy, Luddy, 
Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 

As I was walking, etc. 

Said I, kind justice, pardon me, 

Luddy, Luddy, 

Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 

Said I, kind justice, pardon me, 

Or Botany-Bay I soon shall see 

Luddy, Luddy, 
Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 

Said I, kind justice, etc. 

Sessions and 'sizes are drawing nigh, 

Luddy, Luddy, 
Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 



POOR LUDDY 101 



Sessions and 'sizes are drawing nigh, 
I'd rather you was hung than I. 

Luddy, Luddy, 
Ah, poor Luddy, I. O. 

Sessions and 'sizes, etc. 




102 THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 



[Notes] THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 

[1829] 

[By W. MAGINN: being a translation of Vidocq's 
song, " En roulant de vergne en vergne "]. 



shop ; house As from ken to ken I was going, 

thieving Doing a bit on the prigging lay, 

girl, strumpet, Who should I meet but a jolly blowen, 

sweetheart Tol lol> j ol lol> tol dirol ] ay . 

Who should I meet but a jolly blowen, 
'cute in business Who was fly to the time of day. 

ii 

Who should I meet but a jolly blowen, 

Who was fly to the time of day, 
spoke in slang I pattered in flash like a covey knowing, 

Tol, lol, etc. 
drink and food ' Ay, bub or grubby, I say ? ' 

in 

I pattered in flash like a covey knowing, 
'Ay, bub or grubby, I say?' 



THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 103 

' Lots of gatter,' says she, is flowing porter, bear 

Tol lol, etc. 
Lend me a lift in the family way. [family = frater- 

J J nity of thieves] 

IV 

Lots of gatter, says she, is flowing 
Lend me a lift in the family way. 

You may have a crib to stow in. 

Tol lol, etc. 
Welcome, my pal, as the flowers in May. 



You may have a crib to stow in, 
Welcome, my pal, as the flowers in May. 

To her ken at once I go in 

Tol lol, etc. 
Where in a corner out of the way, 

VI 

To her ken at once I go in. 
Where in a corner out of the way 

With his smeller a trumpet blowing nose 

Tol lol, etc. 

A regular Swell COVe lushy lay. gentleman; drunk 

VII 

With his smeller a trumpet blowing 
A regular swell cove lushy lay, 



104 THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 

pockets; fingers To his dies my hooks I throw in 

Tol lol, etc. 
sover " And collar his dragons clear away.' 

VIII 

To his dies my hooks I throw in, 
And collar his dragons clear away 
watch Then his ticker I set agoing, 

Tol lol, etc. 
seals And his onions, chain, and key. 

IX 

Then his ticker I set a going 
And his onions, chain, and key 
Next slipt off his bottom clo'ing, 

Tol lol, etc. 
hat And his ginger head topper gay. 



Next slipt off his bottom clo'ing 
And his ginger head topper gay. 
clothes Then his other toggery stowing, 

Tol lol, etc. 
plunder All with the swag I sneak away. 

XI 

Then his other toggery stowing 
All with the swag I sneak away. 



THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 105 

Tramp it, tramp it, my jolly blowen, 

Tol lol, etc. 
Or be grabbed by the beaks we may. taken ; police 

XII 

Tramp it, tramp it, my jolly blowen 
Or be grabbed by the beaks we may. 
And we shall caper a-heel and toeing, 

Tol lol, etc. 
A Newgate hornpipe some fine day. hanging 

XIII 

And we shall caper a-heel and toeing 
A Newgate hornpipe some fine day 

With the mots their ogles throwing girl's; eyes 

Tol lol, etc. 
And old Cotton humming his pray. [Notes] 

XIV 

With the mots their ogles throwing 
And old Cotton humming his pray, 

And the fogle hunters doing 

Tol lol, etc. 
Their morning fake in the prigging lay. 



io6 ON THE PRIGGING LAY 




[By H. T. R . . . . : a translation of a French 
Slang song (" Un jour a la Croix Rouge ") 
in Vidocq's Memoirs, 1828-9, 4 vols.]. 



pickpockets Ten or a dozen " cocks of the game," 

thievincr srame : r\ ii i iioii 

thieves' rendez- On the pnggmg lay to the flash-house came, 
drinking gin; Lushing blue ruin and heavy wet 
evening ; sun Till the darkey, when the downy set. 

All toddled and begun the hunt 
P watcheshand- F r readers, tattlers, fogies, or blunt. 

kerchieis; money 

II 

plunder Whatever swag we chance for to get, 

All is fish that comes to net: 
Mind your eye, and draw the yokel, 

Don't disturb or use the folk ill. 
police Keep a look out, if the beaks are nigh, 

run; before they . , ,. , , r ., , a 

see you And cut your stick, before they re fly. 



ON THE PRIGGING LAY 107 



in 

As I vas a crossing St James's Park 

I met a swell, a well-togg'd spark. well- dressed 

I stops a bit : then toddled quicker, 

For I'd prigged his reader, drawn his ticker; stolen his pocket- 

' book and watch 

Then he calls Stop thief! " thinks I, my master, 
That's a hint to me to mizzle faster. run 

IV 

When twelve bells chimed, the prigs returned, thieves 

And rapped at the ken of Uncle : t u se 

" Uncle, open the door of your crib 

If you'd share the swag, or have one dib. plunder; coin 

Quickly draw the bolt of your ken, 

Or we'll not shell out a mag, old ." ^IJ, * half " 



Then says Uncle, says he, to his blowen, woman 

"D'ye twig these coves, my mot so knowing? k ^J^ s . n 

Are they out-and-outers, dearie ? safe to trust 

Are they fogle-hunters, or cracksmen leary? ^r^ars 6 * 5 ' 

Are they coves of the ken, d'ye know ? of our band 
Shall I let 'em in, or tell 'em to go?" 

VI 

" Oh ! I knows 'em now ; hand over my breeches 
I always look out for business vich is 



io8 ON THE PRIGGING LAY 

A reason vy a man should rouse 

At any hour for the good of his house, 
a cheery greeting The top o' the morning, gemmen all, 

And for vot you vants, I begs you'll call." 

VII 

police But now the beaks are on the scene, 

And watched by moonlight where we went ; 

saw us going Stagged us 3. toddling into the ken, 

And were down upon us all; and then 

dandy Who should I spy but the slap-up spark 

r pSer f the What I eased of the swag in St James's Park. 

VIII 

There's a time, says King Sol, to dance and 

[sing; 

I know there's a time for another thing: 
There's a time to pipe, and a time to snivel 
police and magis- I w i sn Q\\ Charlies and beaks at the divel: 

trates 

For they grabbed me on the prigging lay, 
transported And I know I'm booked for Bot'ny Bay. 




THE LAG'S LAMENT 109 



THE LAG'S LAMENT [Notes] 

[1829] 

[By H. T. R. in Vidocq's Memoirs, Vol III. 169]. 



Happy the days when I vorked away, 

In my usual line in the prigging lay, picking pockets 

Making from this, and that, and t'other, 

A tidy living without any bother: 
When my little crib was stored with swag, plunder 

And my cly vas a veil-lined money bag, pocket 

Jolly vas I, for I feared no evil, 

Funked at naught, and pitched care to the devil. 

ii 

I had, beside my blunt, my blowen, money; mistress 

' So gay, so nutty and so knowing ' [Notes] 

On the wery best of grub we lived, food 

And sixpence a quartern for gin I gived; 
My toggs was the sportingst blunt could buy, clothes ; money 

And a slap-up out-and-outer was I. 
Vith my mot on my arm, and my tile on my head, hat 

'That ere's a gemman' every von said. 



i io THE LAG'S LAMENT 



in 

A-coming avay from Wauxhall von night, 
drunken I cleared out a muzzy cove quite ; 

He'd been a strutting avay like a king, 

And on his digit he sported a ring, 
A di'mond sparkler, flash and knowing, 

Thinks I, I'll vatch the vay he's going, 
And fleece my gemman neat and clever, 

So, at least I'll try my best endeavour. 

IV 

A'ter, the singing and fire-vorks vas ended, 
I follows my gemman the vay he tended 
In a dark corner I trips up his heels, 

Took 5 P cket " Then for his tattler and reader I feels, 
pockets his money I pouches his blunt, and I draws his ring, 

Prigged his buckles and every thing, 
And saying, "I thinks as you can't follow, man," 
ran off I pikes me off to Ikey Soloman. 



Then it happened, d'ye see, that my mot, 

Yellow a-bit about the swag that I'd got, 
Thinking that I should jeer and laugh, 

indulge in banter Although I never tips no chaff 

Tries her hand at the downy trick, 

And prigs in a shop, but precious quick 



THE LAG'S LAMENT in 

" Stop thief ! " was the cry, and she vas taken 
I cuts and runs and saves my bacon. 



VI 



"Then," says he, says Sir Richard Birnie, [Notes] 

" I ad wise you to nose on your pals, and turn the inform 

Snitch on the gang, that'll be the best vay betray 

To save your scrag." Then, without delay, neck 
He so prewailed on the treach'rous varmint 

That she was noodled by the Bow St. sarmint persuaded 

Then the beaks they grabbed me, and to prison police ; arrested 

[I vas dragged 

And for fourteen years of my life I vas lagged, transported 



VII 



My mot must now be growing old, 

And so am I if the truth be told; 
But the only vay to get on in the vorld, 

Is to go with the stream, and however ve're 
To bear all rubs; and ven ve suffer [twirld, 

To hope for the smooth ven ve feels the rougher, 
Though very hard, I confess it appears, 

To be lagged, for a lark, for fourteen years. 



ii2 NIX MY DOLL, PALS, FAKE AWAY 



[Notes] "NIX MY DOLL, PALS, FAKE 

AWAY" 

[1834] 



[ByW. HARRISON AINSWORTH, being Jerry Juni- 
per's chaunt in Rookwood\ 

cell; Newgate I n a b ox o f the Stone lUg I WES bom, 
woman whose 

husband has Qf a hempen widow the kid forlorn, 

been hanged ; 

child Fake away ! 

work away ! 

And my father, as I've heard say, 

Fake away! 
dancing master Was a merchant of capers gay, 

Who cut his last fling with great applause. 
never mind, Ni x m y doll, pals, fake away ! 

friends 

hanging To the time of hearty choke with caper sauce. 

Fake away ! 
thieves; prison The knucks in quod did my schoolmen play, 

Fake away ! 
taught me thiev- And put me up to the time of day, 

ing 

Until at last there was none so knowing, 
shoplifter; pick- N O suc h sneaksman or buzgloak going, 

pocket 

Fake away! 
silk handker- FoQ-les and fawnies soon went their way, 

chiefs ; rings 

Fake away ! 



NIX MY DOLL, PALS, FAKE AWAY 113 

To the spout with the sneezers in grand array, P ^^ r x k e e s rs ; 
No dummy hunter had forks so fly, ^S'e'Sgers 

No knuckler so deftly, could fake a cly, pickpocket: steal 

Fake away ! 
No slourd hoxter my snipes could stay, in ton^ > n? etbnt " 

Fake away ! 

None knap a reader like me in the lay. st b e o a j k a P cket - 

Soon then I mounted in swell street-high, 
Nix my doll, pals, fake away ! 
Soon then I mounted in swell street-high. 
And sported my flash est toggery, best made clothes 

Fake away! 
Fainly resolved I would make my hay, 

Fake away! 

While Mercury's star shed a single ray; 
And ne'er was there seen such a dashing prig, 
With my strummel faked in the newest twig, h jjj^. on dressed ; 

Fake away ! 
With my fawnied famms and my onions gay, ^bejewelled; 

Fake away! 
My thimble of ridge and my driz kemesa, gold watch ; lace- 

frilled shirt 

All my togs were so niblike and plash. clothes: fashion- 

able; fine 
Readily the queer screens I then could smash, forged notes; 

pass 

Fake away! 
But my nuttiest blowen one fine day, favorite girl 

Fake away ! 
To the beaks did her fancy-man betray, magistrates; 

sweetheart 

Aud thus was I bowled at last, 



ii4 NIX MY DOLL, PALS, FAKE AWAY 

And into the jug for a lag was cast, 

Fake away! 

handcufts But I slipped my darbies one morn in May, 

warder And gave to the dubsman a holiday, 

And here I am, pals, merry and free, 

A regular rollicking romany. 




THE GAME OF HIGH TOBY 115 



THE GAME OF HIGH TOBY [Notes] 

[1834] 

[By W. HARRISON AINSWORTH in Rookwood\. 



Now Oliver puts his black night-cap on, the moon 

And every star its glim is hiding, H g ht 

And forth to the heath is the scampsman gone, highwayman 

His matchless cherry -black prancer riding ; black horse 
Merrily over the Common he flies, 

Fast and free as the rush of rocket, 
His crape-covered vizard drawn over his eyes, 

His tol by his side and his pops in his pocket, sword; pistols 

Chorus. 

Then who can name 
So merry a game, 
As the game of all games high-toby? high-way robbery 

ii 

The traveller hears him, away! away! 

Over the wide, wide heath he scurries; 
He heeds not the thunderbolt summons to stay, 

But ever the faster and faster he hurries, 



u6 THE GAME OF HIGH TOBY 

fleet horse; horse But what daisy-cutter can match that black tit? 

He is caught he must 'stand and deliver'; 
pocket book Then out with the dummy, and off with the bit, 

Oh! the game of high-toby for ever! 

Chorus. 

Then who can name 
So merry a game 
As the game of all games high-toby? 

in 

Believe me, there is not a game, my brave boys, 

To compare with the game of high-toby; 
highwayman No rapture can equal the tobyman's joys, 
bullets To blue devils, blue plumbs give the go-by; 

gallows And what if, at length, boys, he come to the crap ! 

Even rack punch has some bitter in it, 
gallows For the mare-with-three-legs, boys, I care not 

[a rap, 
'Twill be over in less than a minute ! 

Chorus. 

Then hip, hurrah ! 
Fling care away ! 
Hurrah for the game of high-toby ! 



THE DOUBLE CROSS 117 



THE DOUBLE CROSS [Notes) 

[1834] 

[By W. HARRISON AINSWORTH, in Rookwood]. 



Though all of us have heard of crost fights, 
And certain gains, by certain lost fights; 
I rather fancies that its news, 

How in a mill, both men should lose; fight 

For vere the odds are thus made even, 
It plays the dickens with the Steven: money 

Besides, against all rule they're sinning, 
Vere neither has no chance of vinning. 
Ri, tol, lol, etc. 

II 

Two milling coves, each vide awake, 

Vere backed to fight for heavy stake; 

But in the mean time, so it vos, 

Both kids agreed to play a cross; 

Bold came each buffer to the scratch, man 

To make it look a tightish match ; 

They peeled in style, and bets were making, stripped 



fellow 



[Notes] 



hands 



n8 THE DOUBLE CROSS 

'Tvos six to four, but few were taking. 

Ri, tol, lol, etc. 

in 

Quite cautiously the mill began, 
For neither knew the other's plan : 
Each cull completely in the dark, 
Of vot might be his neighbour's mark; 
Resolved his fibbing not to mind, 
Nor yet to pay him back in kind; 
So on each other kept they tout, 
And sparred a bit, and dodged about. 

Ri, tol, lol, etc. 

IV 

Vith mawleys raised, Tom bent his back, 
As if to place a heavy thwack; 
Vile Jem, with neat left handed stopper, 
Straight threatened Tommy with a topper; 
'Tis all my eye! no claret flows, 
No facers sound no smashing blows, 
Five minutes pass, yet not a hit, 
How can it end, pals ? vait a bit. 

Ri, tol, lol, etc. 



deceive them 



Each cove vos teared with double duty, 
To please his backers, yet play booty, 



THE DOUBLE CROSS 119 

Ven, luckily for Jem, a teller 

Vos planted right upon his smeller 

Down dropped he, stunned ; ven time was called 

Seconds in vain the seconds bawled; 

The mill is o'er, the crosser crost, 

The losers von, the vinners lost. 







120 THE THIEVES' CHAUNT 



[Not es j THE THIEVES' CHAUNT 

[1836] 

(By W. H. SMITH in The Individual]. 

i 

public house There is a. nook in the boozing ken, 

pipe ; smoke Where many a mug I fog, 

And the smoke curls gently, while cousin Ben 
Keeps filling the pots again and again, 

paid a shilling If the coves have stump'd their hog. 



ii 



The liquors around are diamond bright, 
gin And the diddle is best of all; 

But I never in liquors took delight, 
humbug For liquors I think is all a bite, 

porter So for heavy wet I call. 



in 



The heavy wet in a pewter quart, 

As brown as a badger's hue, 
sherry More than Bristol milk or gin, 

Brandy or rum, I tipple in, 
mistress With my darling blowen, Sue. 



THE THIEVES' CHAUNT 121 



IV 

Oh! grunting peck in its eating P0 rk 

Is a richly soft and savoury thing; 

A Norfolk capon is jolly grub red-hen ing 

When you wash it down with strength of bub : lots of beer 

But dearer to me Sue's kisses far, 

Than grunting peck or other grub are, 

And I never funks the lambskin men, judges 

When I sits with her in the boozing ken. 



Her duds are bob she's a kinchin crack, clothes ; neat; fine 

young woman 

And I hopes as how she'll never back; 

For she never lushes dog's-soup or lap, d ks water or 

But she loves my cousin the bluffer's tap. inn-keeper 

She's wide-awake, and her prating cheat, tongue 

For humming a cove was never beat ; fooling a man 

But because she lately nimm'd some tin, stole ; money 

They have sent her to lodge at the King's Head Inn. Newgate [Notes] 




122 THE HOUSE BREAKER'S SONG 



[Notes] THE HOUSE BREAKER'S SONG 

\f. 1838] 

[ByG. W. M. REYNOLDS in Pickivick Abroad]. 



police spy; share j ne'er was a nose, for the reg'lars came 

of the booty 

house wasburgied Whenever a pannie was done: 

Oh! who would chirp to dishonour his name, 

gentlemanly And betrays his pals in a nibsome game 
police-officers To the traps? Not I for one! 

Old Bailey plea- L et no b s i n the fur trade hold their jaw, 

ders 

prison And let the jug be free : 

T?us er> han a d t Let Davy's dust and a well-faked claw 

th?evet ng For fanc y coves be the Om 7 law > 



double-barrelled And a double-tongued squib to keep in awe 

gun 

The chaps that flout at me! 
ii 

drink freely From morn till night we'll booze a ken, 
brandy And we'll pass the bingo round; 

depart At dusk we'll make our lucky, and then, 

With our nags so fresh, and our merry men, 
We'll scour the lonely ground. 

And if the swell resist our " Stand ! " 



THE HOUSE BREAKER'S SONG 123 



We'll squib without a joke; 
For I'm snigger'd if we will be trepanned 
By the blarneying jaw of a knowing hand, 
And thus be lagged to a foreign land, 

Or die by an artichoke. 

in 

But should the traps be on the sly, 

For a change we'll have a crack ; 
The richest cribs shall our wants supply 
Or we'll knap a fogle with fingers fly, 

When the swell one turns his back. 
The flimsies we can smash as well, 

Or a ticker deftly prig: 
But if ever a pal in limbo fell, 
He'd sooner be scragg'd at once than tell; 
Though the hum-box patterer talked of hell, 

And the beak wore his nattiest wig. 



fire 
transported 



hanging [hearty 
choke] 



burglary 

houses 

steal ; handker- 
chief 

skilful 

pass false notes 

watch 

prison 

hanged 

parson 

magistrate; hand 
somest 




124 THE FAKING BOY 



[Notes] "THE FAKING BOY TO THE CRAP 

IS GONE " 

[1841] 
[By BON GAULTIER in Taifs Edinburgh Magazine]. 



pickpocket; gal- The faking boy to the crap is gone, 
g^ws At tne nubbing-cheat you'll find him; 

The hempen cord they have girded on, 
And his elbows pinned behind him. 

blast my eyes! "Smash my glim," cries the reg'lar card, 
" Though the girl you love betrays you, 
Don't split, but die both game and hard, 
And grateful pals shall praise you." 

ii 

The bolt it fell, a jerk, a strain! 
The sheriff's fled asunder; 
The faking-boy ne'er spoke again, 
For they pulled his legs from under. 
And there he dangles on the tree, 
That sort of love and bravery! 
Oh, that such men should victims be 
Of law, and law's vile knavery. 



THE NUTTY BLOWEN 125 



THE NUTTY BLOWEN t Note 

[1841] 

[By BON GAULTIER in "laifs Edinburgh Magazine]. 

i 

She wore a rouge like roses, the night when 

first we met, 
Her lovely mug was smiling o'er mugs of heavy face; 

Wet ; porter 

Her red lips had the fullness, her voice the 

husky tone, 
That told her drink was of a kind where water 

is unknown. 
I saw her but a moment, yet methinks I see 

her now, 
With the bloom of borrowed flowers upon her 

cheek and "brow. 

ii 

A pair of iron darbies, when next we met, handcuffs 

she wore, 
The expression of her features was more thoughtful 

than before ; 
And, standing by her side, was he who strove 

with might and main 



126 THE NUTTY BLOWEN 

To soothe her leaving that dear land she ne'er 

might see again. 
I saw her but a moment, yet methinks I see 

her now, 
As she dropped the judge a curtsey, and he 

made her a bow. 

in 

And once again I see that brow no idle rouge 

is there, 
gaoler's The dubsman's ruthless hand has cropped her 

once luxurious hair; 
She teases hemp in solitude, and there is no 

one near, 
To press her hand within his own, and call for 

ginger-beer. 
I saw her but a moment, yet methinks I see 

her now, 
With the card and heckle in her hand, a-teas- 

ing of that tow. 




THE FAKER'S NEW TOAST 127 




[Notes] 



[By BON GAULTIER ("Nimming Ned") in Taifs 
Edinburgh Magazine] 

I 

Come, all ye jolly covies, vot faking do admire, fellows; stealing 
And pledge them British authors who to our line 

aspire ; 
Who, if they were not gemmen born, like us 

had kicked at trade, 
And every one had turned him out a genuine 

fancy blade, pickpocket 

And a trump, 
ii 

'Tis them's the boys as knows the vorld, 'tis them 

as knows mankind^. 
And vould have picked his pocket too, if Fortune 

(vot is blind) 
Had not to spite their genius, stuck them in a 

false position, 
Vere they can only write about, not execute their 

mission, 

Like a trump. 



128 THE FAKER'S NEW TOAST 



in 

If they goes on as they're begun, things soon will 

come about, 
And ve shall be the upper class, and turn the 

others out; 
Their laws ve'll execute ourselves, and raise their 

hevelation, 
That's tit for tat, for they'd make that the only 

recreation 

Of a trump. 

IV 

But ketch us! only vait a bit, and ve shall be 

their betters; 
For vitch our varmest thanks is due unto the 

men of letters, 
Who, good 'uns all, have showed us up in our 

own proper light, 

steal And proved ve prigs for glory, and all becos 

it's right 

In a trump. 



'Tis ve as sets the fashion: Jack Sheppard is 
fashion the go 

And every word of 'Nix my dolls' the finest 
ladies know ; 



THE FAKER'S NEW TOAST 129 

And ven a man his vortin'd make, vy, vot d'ye 

think's his vay ? 
He does vot ve vere used to do he goes to 

Botany Bay [Notes] 

Like a trump. 

VI 

Then fill your glasses, dolly palls, vy should they 

be neglected, 
As does their best to helewate the line as ve's 

selected ? 
To them as makes the Crackman's life, the burglar's 

subject of their story, 
To Ainsworth, and to Bullvig, and to Reynolds [Notes] 

be the glory, 

Jolly trumps. 




i 3 o MY MOTHER 



[Notes] MY MOTHER 

[1841] 

[By BON GAULTIER in Taifs Edinburgh Magazine}. 

i 

Who, when a baby, lank and thin, 
I called for pap and made a din, 
Lulled me with draughts of British gin? 

My mother. 

ii 

When I've been out upon the spree, 
And not come home till two or three, 
Who was it then would wallop me? 

My mother. 

in 
well-dressed man Who, when she met a heavy swell, 

handkerchief Would ease him of his wipe SO Well, 

And kiss me not to go and tell ? 

My mother. 

IV 

Who took me from my infant play, 
And taught me how to fake away. 



MY MOTHER 131 

And put me Up tO the time Of day? made me cunning 

My mother. 



Who'd watch me sleeping in my chair, 
And slily to my fob repair, pocket 

And leave me not a mopus there ? penny 

My mother. 

VI 

Who, as beneath her care I grew, 
Taught my young mind a thing or two, 
Especially the flats to do? stupid ones 

My mother. 

VII 

I'm Blessed if ever I did see, 

So regular a trump as she: 

I own my virtues all to thee, 

My mother. 

VIII 

So hand, my pals, the drink about, 

My story and my glass are out, 

A bumper, boys, and with me shout 

My mother. 



I 3 2 THE HIGH-PADS FROLIC 



[Notes] THE HIGH-PADS FROLIC 

[1841] 

[By LEMAN REDE, being Kit's and Adelgitha's 
Duet in Sixteen String Jack]. 



clothes Ade - Crissy odsbuds, I'll on with my duds, 

And over the water we'll flare; 
horses KM' Coaches and prads, lasses and lads, 

And fiddlers will be there. 
Ade. There beauty blushes bright, 
Kit. The punch is hot and strong, 

lAnd there we'll whisk it, frisk it, whisk it, 
/ Skip it, and trip it along ! 



II 

Ade. There's Charley Rattan, and natty Jack 

And giant-like Giles McGhee ; [Rann, 
There's Sidle so slim, and flare-away Tim, 
And all of them doat on me. 

Kit. Hadelgitha platonically, Christopher! 

Ade. But Charley, and Jack, and Tim, 
In vain may exert their wit. 



THE HIGH-PADS FROLIC 133 

For still I'll dance it, prance it, dance it, 
Flaring away with Kit ! 

ii 

Kit, There's frollicking Kate, and rollicking Bet, 

And slammerkin Sail so tall, 
And leary-eyed Poll, and blue-eyed Moll 
Blow me, I love them all ! 

Christopher platonically, Hadelgitha ! 
But Winny, not Jenny, nor Sue, 

Shall wean this heart from thee 
So thus I'll trip it, lip it, trip it, 
Trip it with Hadelgitha! 

IV 

Kit. The morning may dawn as sure as you're 
Ade. Will find us dancing alone [born, 

Kit. I'll get a hack, be off in a crack, 
Ade. An elegant Darby and Joan ! 
How'll the vulgarians stare 

As they see you sportingly ! 
For none can splash it, dash it, splash it, 



Both. 



Cnssy J 

? little you and I. 
Addy ] 



134 THE DASHY, SPLASHY 



[Notes] THE DASHY, SPLASHY.... 

LITTLE STRINGER 

[1841] 

[By LEMAN REDE, being Kit's Song in Sixteen- 
String Jack\. 

I 

A cloudy night, and pretty hard it blow'd, 
spirited horse The dashy, splashy, leary little stringer, 

Mounted his roan, and took the road 

Phililoo ! 

" My Lord Cashall's on the road to-night, 
Down with the lads, make my lord alight 
Ran dan row de dow, on we go ! " 
Chorus. Ran, dan, etc. 

IE 

"You horrid wretch," said my Lord to Rann 

The dashy, splashy, leary little stringer 
" How dare you rob a gentleman ? " 

Phililoo ! 

wink Says Jack, says he, with his knowing phiz, 

" I ain't very pertic'Iar who it is ! 
Ran dan row de dow, on we go ! " 
Chorus. Ran, dan, etc. 



LITTLE STRINGER 135 



in 

Ve collar'd the blunt, started off for town, 

With the dashy, splashy, leary little stringer, 
Horses knock'd up, men knock'd down 

Phililoo ! 

A lady's carriage we next espied, 
I collar'd the blunt, Jack jumped inside, 
Ran dan row de dow, on we go! 
Chorus. Ran, dan, etc. 

IV 

Jack took off his hat, with a jaunty air 

The dashy, splashy, leary little stringer 
And he kiss'd the lips of the lady fair 

Phililoo ! 

She sigh'd a sigh, and her looks said plain, 
I don't care much if I'm robb'd again! 
Ran dan row de dow, on we go ! 

Chorus. Ran, dan, etc. 




136 THE BOULD YEOMAN 



Note.] THE BOULD YEOMAN 

[1842] 

[By PIERCE EGAN in Captain Macheath}. 
I 

tell; highwayman A chant I'll tip to you about a High-pad pal 

so down, 
pistols: horse With his pops, and high-bred prad which brought 

to him renown; 

On the road he cut a dash, to him 'twas delight ! 
men And if culls would not surrender, he shewed the 

kiddies fight! 

With his pops so bright and airy, 
And his prad just like a fairy, 
steal He went out to nab the gold ! 

Derry down, down, deny down, 

ii 

He met a bould yeoman, and bid him for to stand ; 
" If I do, I'm damn'd ! " said he, " although you 

cut it grand. 

I'm an old English farmer, and do not me provoke 
I've a cudgel, look ye here, it's a prime tough 

bit of oak! 



THE BOULD YEOMAN 137 

And I'll give you some gravy, beating 

Of that I'll take my davy, oath 

If you try to prig my gold steal 
Deny down. 

in 

Then the High-toby gloque drew his cutlass so [Notes] 

fine; 

Says he to the farmer, " you or I for the shine ! " 
And to it they went both, like two Grecians of old, 
Cutting, slashing, up and down, and all for the gold! 
'Twas cut for cut while it did last, 
Thrashing, licking, hard and fast, 
Hard milling for the gold. fighting 

Derry down. 

IV 

The High-pad quickly cut the farmer's towel in cudgel 

twain 
Pulled out his barking-iron to send daylight through pistol; shoot him 

his brain; 
But said he I will not down you, if you will but 

disburse 

Your rowdy with me, yeoman I'm content to money 
whack your purse! 

Down with the dust, and save your life, money 
Your consent will end our strife, 
Ain't your life worth more than gold ? 
Deny down. 



138 THE BOULD YEOMAN 



money Hand up the pewter, farmer, you shall have a 

share 

A kindness, for a toby gloque, you must say is rare ; 
money That's right tip up the kelter^ it will make my 

bones amends, 
And wherever we may meet, farmer, we'll be 

the best of friends! 

horse So mount your trotter and away, 

And if you ever come this way, 
Take better care of your gold! 
Derry down. 

VI 

Now listen to me, lads, and always you'll do well, 
pocket Empty every clie of duke, commoner, or swell; 

brave man But if you stop a game cove, who has little else 

than pluck, 

rob him of all Do not clean him out, and you'll never want 
for luck. 

So High-pads drink my toast, 
Let honour be our boast, 
And never pluck a poor cull of his gold. 
Derry down. 



THE BRIDLE-CULL AND HIS 139 



THE BRIDLE-CULL AND HIS [Notes] 

LITTLE POP-GUN 
[1842] 

[By PIERCE EGAN in Captain Macheath}. 

I 

My brave brother troopers, slap-up in the abode, 
Come listen unto me while I chant about " the 

Road" ; 

Oh prick up your list'ners if you are fond of fun ears 
A bridle-cull's the hero, and his little pop-gun, highwayman 
Fal, de, rol! lal! lal! la! 

ii 

One morning early he went, this rollicking blade, fellow 
To pick the blunt up, and he met a nice young money 

maid; 
"I'll not rob you," said he, " and so you needn't 

bunk; run away 

But she lammas'd off in style, of his pop-gun went off; 
Fal, de, rol! lal! lal! la! [afunk. afraid 

in 
Then up came a stage-coach, and thus the 

did Say, highwayman 



I 4 o LITTLE POP-GUN 

I'm sorry for to stop you, but you must hear 

my lay; 

" Come, stand and deliver ! if not, sure as the sun, 

Your journey I will stop with my little pop-gun." 

Fal, de, roll lol! lol! 

IV 

highwayman 'Tis by these little lays a High-padsman he thrives, 

money " Oh take a11 our rhino, but pray spare our lives !" 

Cry the passengers who anxious all are for to run, 

Frightened nigh to death by his little pop-gun." 

Fol, de, rol. 



companions; out Then, my blades, when you're bush'd, and must 

of luck; ' J 

plunder have the swag, 

watches ; money ; Walk into tattlers, shiners, and never fear the lag ; 

transportation . _ , 

talk; civilly; give Then patter to all spicey, and tip em lots of fun, 
money And blunt you'll never want while you've got a 

pop-gun. 

Fol, de, rol! la! 




JACK FLASHMAN 141 



JACK FLASHMAN [Notes] 

[1842] 

[By PIERCE EGAN in Captain Macheath]. 

i 

Jack Flashman was a prig so bold, 
Who sighed for nothen but the gold; 

For sounding, frisking any die, robbing; pocket 

Jack was the lad, and never shy. 
Fol, de, rol. 

ii 

Jack long was on the town, a teazer ; c i ev er fellow 

A spicy blade for wedge or sneezer; silve ^ plate; 

snuffbox 

Could turn his fives to anything hands 

Nap a reader, or filch a ring. pocket-book; 

steal a ring 

Fol, de, rol. 
Ill 

Jack was all game, and never slack, bold 

In the darky tried the crack; evening; burglary 

Frisk'd the lobby and the swag; 

"I'm fly to every move," his brag. aware of 

Fol, de, rol. 



JACK FLASHMAN 



rv 

But Jack, at last, got too knowen 

b Se e s d s by bis Was made a flat b - v his blowen! 

gave information She peached, so got him into trouble. 

deserted And then, tipp'd poor Jack the double ! 

Fol, de, rol. 



prison Jack left the jug right mer-ri-ly, 

sweetheart And vent and black'd his doxy's eye! 

Saying look, marm, when next you split, 
I'll finish you with a rummy hit ! 
Fol, de, rol. 

VI 

jnen My blades, before my chaunt I end, 

advice Here the rag-sauce of a friend ; 

Ne'er trust to any fancy jade, 
For all their chaff is only trade ! 
Fol, de, rol. 

VII 

Let all their gammon be resisted; 
hung Vithout you vishes to get twisted! 

talk about And never nose upon yourself 

You then are sure to keep your pelf. 
Fol, de, riddle. 



MISS DOLLY TRULL 



143 



MISS DOLLY TRULL 
[1842] 

[By PIERCE EGAN in Captain MacheatK\. 
i 

Of all the mots in this here jug, 

There's none like saucy Dolly; 
And but to view her dimber mug 

Is e'er excuse for folly. 
She runs such precious cranky rigs 

With pinching wedge and lockets 
Yet she's the toast of all the prigs 

Though stealing hearts and pockets. 

ii 

Just twig Miss Dolly at a hop 

She tries to come the graces ! 
To gain her end she will not stop 

And all the swells she chases. 
She ogles, nods, and patters flash 

To ev'ry flatty cully 
Until she frisks him, at a splash 

Of rhino, wedge, and tully. 



[Notes] 



women ; prison 



pretty face 



stealing plate 



see ; dance 
act 



talks slang 
susceptible fellow 
robs ; entirely 
money 



144 THE BY-BLOW OF THE JUG 



[Notes] THE BY-BLOW OF THE JUG 

[1842] 

[By PIERCE EGAN in Captain Macheath]. 

i 

child In Newgate jail the jolly kid was born 

Infamy he suck'd without any scorn ! 
His mammy his father did not know, 
But that's no odds Jack was a by-blow ! 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 

ii 

feet Scarcely had Jack got on his young pins, 

When his mammy put him up to some very 

[bad sins, 

And she taught him soon to swear and lie, 
And to have a finger in every pie. 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 

in 

accomplished; His mammy was downy to every rig, 
thief Before he could read she made him a prig ; 

Very soon she larn'd Jack to make a speak 
round for theft And he toddled out on the morning sneak 

Foddy, loddy, high O. 



THE BY-BLOW OF THE JUG 145 



IV 

Jack had a sharp-looking eye to ogle, leer 

And soon he began to nap the fogle! S chfeV handker - 

And ever anxious to get his whack 

When scarcely ripe, he went on the crack. housebreaking 

Foddy, loddy, high O. 



" Now, my chick," says she, "you must take the 
'Tis richer than the finest abode, [road! 

For watches, purses, and lots of the gold 
A scampsman, you know, must always be bold." highwayman 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 

VI 

His mother then did give Jack some advice, 
To her son a thief, who was not o'er nice ; 
Says she "Fight your way, Jack, and stand the 

[brunt, 

You're of no use, my child, without the blunt, money 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 

VII 

" Then keep it up, Jack, with rare lots of fun. 
A short life, perhaps, but a merry one; 
Your highway dodges may then live in fame, 

10 



146 THE BY-BLOW OF THE JUG 

Cheat miss-Fortune, and be sure to die game." 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 

VIII 

"In spite of bad luck, don't be a grumbler; 
cart [Notes] If you are finished off from a tumbler ! 
But to the end of your life, cut a shine, 
You're not the first man got into a line." 
Foddy, loddy, high O. 




THE CADGER'S BALL 147 



THE CADGER'S BALL [Note s] 

[1852] 

[From JOHN LABERN'S Popular Comic Song Book]. 
Tune Joe Buggtns. 



Oh, what a spicy flare-up, tear-up, 

Festival Terpsickory, 
Was guv'd by the genteel cadgers 

In the famous Rookery. 
As soon as it got vind, however, 

Old St Giles's vos to fall 
They all declar'd, so help their never, 

They'd vind up vith a stunnin' ball! 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 

ii 

Jack Flipflap took the affair in hand, sirs 
Who understood the thing complete 

He'd often danced afore the public, 
On the boards, about the streets. 

Old Mother Swank ey, she consented 

To lend her lodging-house for nix nothing 



148 THE CADGER'S BALL 

Say's she, 'The crib comes down to-morrow, 
merrily So, go it, just like beans and bricks.' 

Tol, lol lol, etc. 

in 

walking The night arrived for trotter-shaking 

lodging-house To Mother Swankey's snoozing-crib ; 

Each downy cadger was seen taking 
sweetheart; wife His bit of inuslin, or his rib. 

Twelve candles vos stuck into turnips, 

Suspended from the ceiling queer 
Bunn's blaze of triumph was all pickles 
To this wegetable shandileer. 

Tol, lol lol, etc. 

IV 

Ragged Jack, wot chalks ' Starvation ! ' 

Look'd quite fat and swellish there 
While Dick, wot 'dumbs it' round the nation, 

Had all the jaw among the fair. 
Limping Ned wot brought his duchess, 

At home had left his wooden pegs 
And Jim, wot cadges it on crutches, 

Vos the nimblest covey on his legs. 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 



The next arrival was old Joe Burn, 

Wot does the fits to Natur chuff 



THE CADGER'S BALL 149 

And Fogg, wot's blind each day in Ho'born, 

Saw'd his way there clear enough, 
Mr. Sinniwating Sparrow, 

In corduroys span new and nice, 
Druv up in his pine-apple barrow, 

Which he used to sell a win a slice. P enn y 

Tol, lol lol, etc. 

VI 

The ball was open'd by fat Mary, 

Togg'd out in book muslin pure, dressed 

And Saucy Sam, surnamed 'The Lary,' 

Who did the ' Minuit-on-a-squre? 
While Spifflicating Charley Coker, 

And Jane of the Hatchet-face divine, 
Just did the Rowdydowdy Poker, 

And out of Greasy took the shine. [Grisi?] 

Tol, lol lol, etc. 

VII 

The Sillywarious next was done in 

Tip-top style just as it should, 
By Muster and Missus Mudfog, stunning, 

Whose hair curled like a bunch of wood. 
The folks grinn'd all about their faces, 

'Cos Mudfog prince of flashy bucks 
Had on a pair of pillow Cases, 

Transmogrified slap into ducks! 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 



150 THE CADGER'S BALL 

VIII 

The celebrated Pass de Sandwich 

To join in no one could refuse 
Six bushels on 'em came in, and wich 

Wanish'd in about two two's. 

beer The Gatter Waltz next followed arter 

dronk They lapp'd it down, right manful-ly, 

Until Joe Guffin and his darter, 
Was in a state of Fourpen-ny ! 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 

IX 

Next came the Pass de Fascination 

Betwixt Peg Price and Dumby Dick 
But Peg had sich a corporation, 

He dropp'd her like a red hot brick. 
The company was so enraptur'd, 

They buckets of vail flowers threw 
But one chap flung a bunch of turnips, 

Which nearly split Dick's nut in two. 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 



The dose now set to gallopading, 

And stamp'd with all their might and main 
They thump'd the floor so precious hard-in, 

It split the ancient crib in twain, 



THE CADGER'S BALL 151 

Some pitch'd in the road, bent double- 
Some was smash'd with bricks done brown 

So the cadgers saved 'The Crown' the trouble 
Of sending coves to pull it down. 
Tol, lol lol, etc. 




152 "DEAR BILL, THIS STONE-JUG" 



[Notes] "DEAR BILL, THIS STONE-JUG" 

[1857] 

[From Punch, 31 Jan., p. 49. Being an Epistle from 
Toby Cracksman, in Newgate, to Bill Sykes]. 



prison Dear Bill, this stone-jug at which flats dare to rail, 

(From which till the next Central sittings I hail), 
Is still the same snug, free-and-easy old hole, 
mistresses Where Macheath met his blowens, and Wild 

[floor' d his bowl 

In a ward with one's pals, not locked up in a cell, 
[Notes] To an old hand like me it's a family hotel. 



ii 



*booz\e ' bam " * n ^ e dayrooms the cuffins we queers at our ease, 
night And at Darkmans we run the rig just as we please, 

meat and drink There's your peck and your lush, hot and reg'lar 

[each day. 
All the same if you work, all the same if you 

[play 
greenhorn But the lark's when a goney up with us they shut 

tricks; talking . . , 

slang; obscenity As am t up to our lurks, our flash patter, and smut; 



"DEAR BILL, THIS STONE-JUG" 153 



in 

But soon in his eye nothing green would remain, 
He knows what's o'clock when he comes out again. 
And the next time he's quodded so downy imprisoned 

[and snug, 

He may thank us for making him fly to the jug. up to prison ways 
But here comes a cuffin who cuts short my tale, 
It's agin rules is screevin' to pals out o' gaol. writin e 

[The following postscript seems to have been 
added when the Warder had passed.] 

IV 

For them coves in Guildhall, and that blessed 

[Lord Mayor, 
Prigs on their four bones should chop whiners on knees should 

pray 

[I swear: 

That long over Newgit their Worships may rule, 
As the high-toby, mob, crack and screeve model h'g 11 ^ 111 * 11 : 

J ' swell-mobsmen ; 

[scllOOl burglars, forgers 

For if Guv'ment wos here, not the Alderman's 

[Bench, 

Newgit soon 'ud be bad as 'the Pent,' or 'the [Notes] 

[Tench '. 



154 THE LEARY MAN 



[Notes] THE LEARY MAN 

[I8S7] 

[From The Vulgar Tongue, by DUCANGE ANGLICUS]. 



Of ups and downs I've felt the shocks 
Since days of bats and shuttlecocks, 
And allcumpaine and Albert-rocks, 

When I the world began; 
And for these games I often sigh 
Both marmoney and Spanish-fly, 
And flying kites, too, in the sky, 

For which I've often ran. 

ii 

But by what I've seen, and where I've been, 

I've always found it so, 

That if you wish to learn to live 

Too much you cannot know. 
For you must now be wide-awake, 
If a living you would make, 
So I'll advise what course to take 

To be a Leary Man. 



THE LEARY MAN 155 

ii 

Go first to costermongery, 

To every fakement get a-fly, dodge ; learn 

And pick up all their slangery, 

But let this be your plan; 

Put up with no Kieboshery, nonsense 

But look well after poshery, money 

And cut teetotal sloshery, drink 

And get drunk when you can. 

IV 

And when you go to spree about, 

Let it always be your pride 

To have a white tile on your nob bat ; head 

And bull-dog by your side 

Your fogle you must flashly tie necktie 

Each word must patter flashery, ^ik slang 

And hit cove's head to smashery, 

To be a Leary Man. 

v 

To Covent Garden or Billingsgate 
You of a morn must not be late, 
But your donkey drive at a slashing rate, 

And first be if you can. 
From short pipe you must your bacca blow 
And if your donkey will not go, 
To lick him you must not be slow 

But well his hide must tan. 



156 THE LEARY MAN 



VI 

The fakement conn'd by knowing rooks 
Must be well known to you, 
And if you come to fibbery, 

You must mug one or two. 
[Notes] Then go to St Giles's rookery, 

And live up some strange nookery, 
Of no use domestic cookery, 
To be a Leary Man. 

VII 

Then go to pigeon fancery 

And know each breed by quiz of eye, 

Bald-heads from skin- 'ems by their fly, 

Go wrong you never can. 
All fighting coves too you must know 
Ben Caunt as well as Bendigo, 
And to each mill be sure to go, 
And be one of the van. 

VIII 

Things that are found before they're lost, 

Be always first to find. 

Restore dogs for a pound or two 

You'll do a thing that's kind, 
And you must sport a blue billy, 
handkerchief Or a yellow wipe tied loosily 



THE LEARY MAN 157 

Round your scrag for bloaks to see neck ; men 

That you're a Leary Man 

IX 

At knock-'em-downs and tiddlywink, 
To be a sharp you must not shrink, 
But be a brick and sport your chink g d ney feUow; 

To win must be your plan. 
And set-toos and Cock-fighting 
Are things you must take delight in, 
And always try to be right in 

And every kidment scan. 



And bullying and chaffing too, 
To you should be well known, 
Your nob be used to bruisery, head ; pugilism 

And hard as any stone. 
Put the kiebosh on the dibbery, 
Know a Joey from a tibbery, 
And now and then have a black eye, 

To be a Leary Man. 

XI 

To fairs and races go must you, 
And get in rows and fights a few, 
And stopping out all night it's true 
Must often be your plan. 



158 THE LEARY MAN 

And as through the world you budgery, 
Get well awake to fudgery, 
And rub off every grudgery, 

And do the best you can. 

XII 

But mummery and slummery 
You must keep in your mind, 
For every day, mind what I say, 

Fresh fakements you will find. 
But stick to this while you can crawl. 
To stand 'till you're obliged to fall, 
And when you're wide awake to all 

You'll be a Leary Man. 




A HUNDRED STRETCHES HENCE 159 



"A HUNDRED STRETCHES [Notes] 

HENCE" 

[i859] 

[From The Vocabiilum : or Rogues Lexicon, by G. 
W. MATSELL, New York], 



Oh ! where will be the culls of the bing publicans 

A hundred stretches hence? years 

The bene morts who sweetly sing, pretty women 

A hundred stretches hence? 

The autum-cacklers, autum-coves, Tnl'men" 1611 

The jolly blade who wildly roves; boon companion 

And where the buffer, bruiser, blowen, Ttfwhore^ 1 " 

And all the cops, and beaks so knowin, police; magistrate 

A hundred stretches hence ? 

ii 

And where the swag so bleakly pinched P S r cleverly 

A hundred stretches hence? 

The thimbles, slangs, and danglers filched, w ^Sflt M; 

A hundred stretches hence? 

The chips, the , fawneys, chatty-feeders, "spoons 

T-L. i .LL i in /~n i breast-pins; purses 

Ihe bugs, the boungs, anj well-filled readers ; p0 cket-book 



160 A HUNDRED STRETCHES HENCE 

And where the fence > and snoozing ken, 
thieves; drunk- With all the prigs and lushing men, 
A hundred stretches hence? 

in 

Played out they lay, it will be said 

A hundred stretches hence; 
buried With shovels they were put to bed 

A hundred stretches since ! 

taken to gaol had _ 

cheated a life borne rubbed to wit had napped a winder, 
hanged; drowned And some were scragged and took a blinder, 

oneself _, 

got rid of the rlanted the swag and lost to sight, 

We'll bid them one and all good-night, 
A hundred stretches hence. 




THE CHICKALEARY COVE 161 



THE CHICKALEARY COVE [Notes] 

[c. 1864] 



I'm a ' Chickaleary bloke ' with my one, two, three, whitecbapei 

swell 

Whitechapel was the village I was born in, 
For to get me on the hop, or on my tibby drop, et the better f 

You must wake up very early in the morning. 
I have a rorty gal, also a knowing pal, flashiy dressed; 

clever 

And merrily together we jog on, 

I doesn't care a flatch, as long as I've a tach, halfpenny; hat 
Some pannum for my chest, and a tog on. eatahies; coat 
I'm a Chickaleary bloke with my one, two, 

[three, 

Whitechapel was the village I born in, 
For to get me on the hop, or on my 

[tibby drop, 
You must wake up very early in the morning. 

II 

Now kool my downy kicksies the style for me, look '> trot > sers 

flashiy out 

Built on a plan werry naughty, 

The stock around my squeeze a guiver colour see, nec k ; flash 

ii 



162 THE CHICKALEARY COVE 

rest ; pockets And the vestat with the bins so rorty, 

teetotaller My tailor serves you well, from a perger to a swell, 

place At Groves's you're safe to make a sure pitch, 

money For ready yenom down, there ain't a shop in town, 

beat Can lick Groves in The Cut as well as Shoreditch. 

I'm a Chickaleary bloke, etc. 

in 

Off to Paris I shall go, to show a thing or two 
pickpockets To the dipping blokes what hangs about the 

[caffes, 

[Notes]; watch; How to do a cross-fam, for a super, or a slang, 
And to bustle them grand'armes I'd give the 

[office : 
Now my pals I'm going to slope, see you soon 

[again, I hope, 

My young woman is awaiting, so be quick; 
salute; shout Now join in a chyike, the jolly we all like, 
I'm off with a party to the Vic. 
I'm a Chickaleary bloke, etc. 




BLOOMING /ESTHETIC 163 



BLOOMING ESTHETIC [Notes] 

[1882] 

[From The Rag, 30 Sept.]. 
He 



A dealer-in-coke young man, 
A wallop-his-moke young man, 
A slosher-of-pals, 

A SpOOning-with-gals, making love 

An ought-to-be-blowed young man. 



A tell-a-good-whopper young man, lie 

A slogging-a-copper young man, ^^ the 

A pay-on-the-nod, ta c ^ dit unliraited 

An always-in-quod, in prison 

A sure-to-be-scragged young man. hung 

in 

A Sunday-flash -togs young man, clothes 

A pocket-of-hogs young man, silver 

A save-all-his-rhino, money 
A cut-a-big-shine, oh, 
Will soon-have-a-pub young man 



164 BLOOMING ESTHETIC 

She 

i 

A powder-and-paint young girl, 
Not-quite-a-saint young girl, 

drunk An always-get-tight, 

A stay-out-all-night, 

child Have-a-kid-in-the-end young girl. 

ii 

Make-a-bloke-a-choke young girl, 
drunken bout Love-a-gin-soak young girl, 

On-the-kerb-come-a-cropper, 
policeman Run-in-by-a-copper, 

" Fined-forty-bob " young girl. 

in 

A tallow-faced-straight young girl, 
A never-out-late young girl, 
A Salvation-mummery, 
Smoleless-and-glummery, 
Kid-by-a-captain young girl. 




'ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 165 



'ARRY AT A POLITICAL [Notes] 

PIC NIC 

[By T Milliken in Punch, u Oct.] 
DEAR CHARLIE. 

i 
'Ow are yer, my ribstone ? Seems scrumtious to 

write the old name. 
I 'ave quite lost the run of you lately. Bin playing sight 

some dark little game? 
I'm keeping mine hup as per usual, fust in the 

pick of the fun, 
For wherever there's larks on the tappy there's 

'Arry as sure as a gun. 

ii 

The latest new lay's Demonstrations. You've 

heard on 'em, Charlie, no doubt, 
For they're at 'em all over the shop. I 'ave 'ad 

a rare bustle about. 
All my Saturday arfs are devoted to Politics. 

Fancy, old chump, 
Me doing the sawdusty reglar, and follering swells nonsense 

on the stump! 



1 66 'ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 



in 

talking But, bless yer, my bloater, it isn't all chin-music, 

votes, and "Ear! 'ear!' 
Or they wouldn't catch me on the ready, or nail 

me for ninepence. No fear! 
walking Percessions I've got a bit tired of, hoof-padding 

and scrouging's dry rot, 

But Political Picnics mean sugar to them as is 
fly to wot's wot. 

IV 

Went to one on 'em yesterday, Charlie; a reglar 

old up and down lark. 
The Pallis free gratis, mixed up with a old country 

fair in a park, 
And Rosherville Gardens chucked in, with a dash 

of the Bean Feast will do, 
To give you some little idear of our day with 

Sir Jinks Bottleblue. 



Make much of us, Charlie? Lor bless you, we 
might ha' bin blooming Chinese 

A -doing the rounds at the 'Ealthries. Twas 
regular go as you please. 

Lawn-tennis, quoits, cricket, and dancing for them 
as must be on the shove, 



'ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 167 

But I preferred pecking and prowling, and spotting eating 
the mugs making love. fools 

VI 

Don't ketch me a-slinging my legs about arter 

a beast of a ball 
At ninety degrees in the shade or so, Charlie, 

old chap, not at all. 
Athletics 'aint 'ardly my form, and a cutaway 

coat and tight bags trousers 

Are the species of togs for yours truly, and lick 

your loose 'flannels' to rags. 

VII 

So I let them as liked do a swelter ; I sorntered 

about on the snap. prowl 

Rum game this yer Politics, Charlie, seems arf 

talkee-talkee and trap. 
Jest fancy old Bluebottle letting the 'multitood' 

pic-nic and lark, 
And make Battersea Park of his pleasure-grounds, 

Bathelmy Fair of his park ! 

VIII 

' To show his true love for the People ! ' sezs one 

vote-of-thanking tall-talker, 
And wosn't it rude of a bloke as wos munching 

a bun to cry 'Walker!'? [Notes] 



1 68 'ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 

I'm Tory right down to my boots, at a price, 

and I bellered "Ear, 'ear!' 

catch But they don't cop yours truly with chaff none 

the more, my dear Charlie, no fear! 

IX 

shook hands Old Bottleblue tipped me his flipper, and 'oped 

I'd ' refreshed, ' and all that. 
' Wy rather, ' sez I, 'wot do you think? ' at which 

he stared into his 'at, 

face And went a bit red in the gills. Must ha' thought 

fool me a muggins, old man, 

To ask sech a question of 'Arry as though 
grubbing short was his plan. 



I went the rounds proper, I tell yer; 'twas like 

the free run of a Bar, 
And Politics wants lots o' wetting. Don't ketch 

me perched up on a car, 
Or 'olding a flag-pole no more. No, percessions, 

dear boy, ain't my fad, 
But Political Picnics with fireworks, and plenty 

of swiz ain't 'arf bad. 

XI 

The palaver was sawdust and treacle. Old 
Bottleblue buzzed for a bit, 



ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 169 

And a sniffy young Wiscount in barnacles landed 

wot 'e thought a 'it; 
Said old Gladstone wos like Simpson's weapon, 

a bit of a hass and all jor, 
When a noisy young Rad in a wideawake wanted 

to give him what for! 

XII 

Yah ! boo ! Turn 'im hout ! ' sings yours truly, 

a-thinkin' the fun was at 'and, 
But, bless yer ! 'twas only a sputter. I can't say 

the meeting looked grand. 
Five thousand they reckoned us, Charlie, but if 

so I guess the odd three 
Were a-spooning about in the halley's, or lappin' 

up buns and Bohea. 

XIII 

The band and the 'opping wos prime though, 

and 'Arry in course wos all there. 
I 'ad several turns with a snappy young party 

with stror coloured 'air. 
Her name she hinformed me wos Polly, and wen 

in my 'appiest style, 
I sez, ' Polly is nicer than Politics ! ' didn't she 

colour and smile? 

XIV 

We got back jest in time for the Fireworks, a 
proper flare-up, and no kid, 



170 'ARRY AT A POLITICAL PICNIC 

Which finished that day's Demonstration, an' 

must 'ave cost many a quid. 
Wot fireworks and park-feeds do Demonstrate, 

Charlie, I'm blest if I see, 
And I'm blowed if I care a brass button, so long 

as I get a cheap spree. 

xv 

The patter's all bow-wow, of course, but it goes 

with the buns and the beer. 
If it pleases the Big-wigs to spout, wy it don't 

cost hus nothink to cheer. 
Though they ain't got the 'ang of it, Charlie, the 

toffs ain't no go and no spice ! 
Why, I'd back Barney Crump at our Singsong 

to lick 'em two times out o' twice! 

XVI 

Still I'm all for the Lords and their lot, Charlie. 

Rads are my 'orror, you know. 
Change R into C and you've got 'em, and 'Any 

'ates anythink low. 
So if Demonstrations means skylarks, and lotion 

as much as you'll carry, 
These ' busts of spontanyous opinion' may reckon 

all round upon 'Arry. 



"RUM COVES THAT RELIEVE US" 171 



"RUM COVES THAT RELIEVE US" [No tes] 
[1887] 

[By HEINRICH BAUMANN in Londonismen]. 



Rum coves that relieve us thieves 

Of chinkers and pieces, money 

Is gin'rally lagged, imprisoned 

Or wuss luck gets scragg'd. hung 

ii 

i j j counterfeiters ; 

Are smashers and divers pickpockets 

And noble contrivers 

Not SOld tO the beaks magistrates 

By the COpperS an' Sneaks ? police ; informers 

in 

Yet moochin' arch-screevers, ^tter^Sr 6 

Concoctin' deceivers, 

Chaps as reap like their own 

What by tothers were sown; 

IV 

PirnHral fatprc writers of " blood 

and thunder" 

Of bosh by the acres, 



172 "RUM COVES THAT RELIEVE US" 

These muck-worms of trash 
Cut, oh, a great dash. 



But, there, it don't matter 
Since, to cut it still fatter, 
By 'ook and by crook 
Ve've got up this book. 

VI 

queer places Tell ye 'ow ? Vy in rum kens, 

thieves' resorts In flash cribs and slum dens, 

I' the alleys and courts, 
'Mong the doocedest sorts ; 



VII 



When jawin' with Jillie 
Or. Mag and 'er Billie, 
Ve shoved down in black 
talk Their illigant clack. 

VIII 

So from hartful young dodgers, 
men From vaxy old codgers, 

prostitutes From the blowens ve got 

Soon to know vot is vot. 



RUM COVES THAT RELIEVE US" 173 



IX 



Now then there is yer sumptuous 

Tuck-in of most scrumptious, 

And dainty mag-pie! speech 

Will ye jes' come and try? 




i?4 VILLON'S GOOD-NIGHT 



[Notes] VILLON'S GOOD-NIGHT 

[1887] 

[By WILLIAM ERNEST HENLEY]. 



false ciericos You bible-sharps that thump on tubs, 

b skkness feigning You lurkers on the Abram-sham, 

cadgers; loafing You sponges miking round the pubs, 

S sens y e girl$; n D " Y U fl y m y titterS f nd f flam 

W g a^ e e n; dress; You J udes that clobb er for the stramm, 

[Notes] You ponces good at talking tall, 

rings; right hand With fawneys on your dexter famm 

harlot [Notes] A mot's good-night to one and all! 



ii 



P pap? utes;exp se Likewise 7 OU m olls that flash your bubs 

see ; pay for For swells to spot and stand you sam, 

[Notes] You bleeding bonnets, pugs, and subs, 

P man h ~ and ~ Judy ~ You swatchel-coves that pitch and slam, 

pattering trades- YOU magsmen bold that work the cram, 

man 

You flats and joskins great and small, 
wife Gay grass-widows and lawful-jam 

A mot's good-night to one and all! 




VILLON'S GOOD-NIGHT 175 



in 

For you, you coppers, narks, and dubs, p ^ 

Who pinched me when upon the snam, arrested; stealing 

And gave me mumps and mulligrubs "the blues" 

With skilly and swill that made me clam, refuse food 

At you I merely lift my gam leg 

I drink your health against the wall! urinate 

That is the sort of man I am, 

A mot's good-night to one and all! 

The Farewell. 

Paste 'em, and larrup 'em, and lamm! (thrash them and 

Give Kennedy, and make 'em crawl! i make thera stir 

I do not care one bloody damn, 
A mot's good-night to one and all. 



176 VILLON'S STRAIGHT TIP 



VILLON'S STRAIGHT TIP TO ALL 
CROSS COVES 

[1887] 

[By WILLIAM ERNEST HENLEY], 
' Tout aux tavernes et aux filles ' 

I 

for Suppose you screeve, or go cheap-jack ? 
Or fake the broads ? or fig a nag ? 
Or thimble-rig? or knap a yack? 
Or pitch a snide ? or smash a rag ? 
Suppose you duff? or nose and lag? 
Or get the straight, and land your pot? 
How do you melt the multy swag ? 
Booze and the blowens cop the lot. 

ii 

Fiddle, or fence, or mace, or mack; 
Or moskeneer, or flash the drag; 
Dead-lurk a crib, or do a crack ; 
Pad with a slang, or chuck a mag ; 
Bonnet, or tout, or mump and gag; 
Rattle the tats, or mark the spot 



TO ALL CROSS COVES 177 

You cannot bank a single stag: 
Booze and the blowens cop the lot. 

in 

Suppose you try a different tack, 
And on the square you flash your flag ? 
At penny-a-lining make your whack, 
Or with the mummers mug and gag? 
For nix, for nix the dibbs you bag 
At any graft, no matter what ! 
Your merry goblins soon stravag: 
Booze and the blowens cop the lor. 

The Moral. 

It's up-the-spout and Charley-Wag 
With wipes and tickers and what not ! 
Until the squeezer nips your scrag, 
Booze and the blowens cop the lot. 




12 



178 CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 



[Notes] CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 

[1887] 

[By WILLIAM ERNEST HENLEY: "Inscribed to 
an intense poet"]. 

I. Rondeau. 



" O crikey, Bill ! " she ses to me, she ses. 

"Look sharp," ses she, " with them there sossiges. 
sausages Yea ! sharp with them there bags of mysteree ! 

friend For lo ! " she ses, "for lo! old pal," ses she, 

very hungry " I'm blooming peckish, neither more nor less." 

n 

Was it not prime I leave you all to guess 
giri How prime! to have a jude in love's distress 

fondling; softly Come spooning round, and murmuring balm- 

[ilee, 
"O crikey, Bill!" 

m 

thus expressively For in such rorty wise doth Love express 

[Notes] His blooming views, and asks for your address, 



CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 179 

And makes it right, and does the gay and free. 
I kissed her I did so! And her and me 
Was pals. And if that ain't good business. 
O crikey, Bill! 

II. Villanelle. 
I 

Now ain't they utterly too-too n i ce 

(She ses, my Missus mine, ses she), 

Them flymy little bits of Blue. Notes] />. china 

ii 

Joe, just you kool 'em nice and skew i 00 k at 

Upon our old meogginee, 

Now ain't they utterly too-too? 

in 

They're better than a pot'n a screw, 
They're equal to a Sunday spree, 
Them flymy little bits of Blue ! 

IV 

Suppose I put 'em up the flue, pawn 

And booze the profits, Joe? Not me. drink 

Now ain't they utterly too-too? 

v 

I do the 'Igh Art fake, I do. 
Joe, I'm consummate; and I see 
Them flymy little bits of Blue. 



i8o CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 



VI 

Which, Joe, is why I ses to you 
yEsthetic-like, and limp, and free 
Now ain't they utterly too-too, 
Them flymy little bits of Blue ? 

III. Ballade. 



I often does a quiet read 
Botticelli (?) At Booty Shelley's poetry; 

I thinks that Swinburne at a screed 

Is really almost too-too fly; 
Wagner (?) ^.t Signer Vagna's harmony 

I likes a merry little flutter; 

I've had at Pater many a shy; 

In fact, my form's the Bloomin' Utter. 

ii 

My mark's a tidy little feed, 
And 'Enery Irving's gallery, 
To see old 'Amlick do a bleed, 
And Ellen Terry on the die, 
Or Franky's ghostes at hi-spy, 

^rotherspr' * 11 ^^ P art ^ es carried on a shutter 

Them vulgar Coupeaus is my eye! 
In fact, my form's the Bloomin' Utter. 



CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 181 



in 

The Grosvenor's nuts it is, indeed! 

I goes for 'Olman 'Unt like pie. 

It's equal to a friendly lead [Notesj 

To see B. Jones's judes go by. 

Stanhope he makes me fit to cry, 

Whistler he makes me melt like butter, 

Strudwick he makes me flash my cly spend money 

In fact, my form's the Bloomin' Utter. 

Envoy. 

I'm on for any Art that's 'Igh! 

I talks as quite as I can splutter; 

I keeps a Dado on the sly; 

In fact, my form's the Blooming Utter! 




182 "TOTTIE" 



[Notes] "TOTTIE" 

[1887] 
[By " DAGONET " (G. R. SIMS) in Referee, 7 Nov.]. 



As she walked along the street 
feet With her little 'plates of meat,' 

And the summer sunshine falling 
hair On her golden 'Barnet Fair,' 

Bright as angels from the skies 

eyes Were her dark blue 'mutton pies.' 

breast In my 'East and West' Dan Cupid 

Shot a shaft and left it there. 



ii 



nose She'd a Grecian 'I suppose,' 

teeth And of ' Hampstead Heath ' two rows, 

mouth In her ' Sunny South ' that glistened 

Like two pretty strings of pearls; 
knees Down upon my 'bread and cheese' 

Did I drop and murmur, 'Please 
wife Be my "storm and strife," dear Tottie, 

O, you darlingest of girls ! ' 



TOTTIE" 183 



in 

Then a bow-wow by her side, dog 

Who till then had stood and tried 

A 'Jenny Lee' to banish, flee 

Which was on his 'Jonah's whale,' tail 
Gave a hydrophobia bark, 

(She cried, 'What a Noah's Ark!') lark 

And right through my 'rank and riches' breeches 

Did my 'cribbage pegs' assail. legs 

IV 

Ere her bull-dog I could stop 

She had called a 'ginger pop,' slop = policeman 

Who said, 'What the "Henry Meville" devil 

Do you think you're doing there?' 
And I heard as off I slunk, 
'Why, the fellow's "Jumbo's trunk!" drunk 

And the 'Walter Joyce' was Tottie's voice 

With the golden 'Barnet Fair.' hair 




1 84 A PLANK BED BALLAD 



[Notes] A PLANK BED BALLAD 



[By DAGONET" (G. R. SIMS) in Referee, 12 Feb.]. 



Understand, if you please, I'm a travelling thief, 
boys The gonophs all call me the gypsy; 

rail; ticket By the rattler I ride when I've taken my brief, 

basket And I sling on my back an old kipsey. 



ii 



S for ; snver plate If * P * Pe * g d hat ' Wh ^' * tOUCh f r the wed g e 

But I'm not a "particular" robber; 
steal ; linen I smug any snowy I see on the hedge, 
boots; clothes And I ain't above daisies and clobber. 



in 



5 notes; pocket One day I'd a spree with two finns in my brigh, 
w g a oi c d ; chain; And a tov and a tackle both red 'uns; 
diamond pin; And a spark prop a pal (a good screwsman) and I 
Had touched for in working two dead 'uns. 



IV 



ticket I was taking a ducat to get back to town 

(I had come by the rattler to Dover), 



A PLANK BED BALLAD 185 

When I saw as a reeler was roasting me brown, *%% c ra sely 
And he rapped, "I shall just turn you over." said; search you 



V 



I guyed, but the reeler he gave me hot beef, r ^j tea ' chased 

And a scuff came about me and hollered; 

I pulled out a chive, but I soon came to grief, knife 

And with screws and a James I was collared. b ^ a h r t s tools : 



VI 



I was fullied, and then got three stretch for the job, remanded ; years 

And my trip cuss the day as I seen her mistress 

She sold off my home to some pals in her mob, friends; set 

For a couple of foont and ten deener. 5 notes; shillings 



VII 



Oh, donnys and omees, what gives me the spur, g i r i ; fellows 

Is, I'm told by a mug (he tells whoppers), man [Notes] 

That I ought to have greased to have kept out bribed 

[of stir 

The dukes of the narks and the coppers. h 2c e detecti 




1 86 THE RONDEAU OF THE KNOCK 



[Notes] THE RONDEAU OF THE KNOCK 

[1890] 

[By " DAGONET " (G. R. SIMS) in Referee, 20 Ap. 
P- 7J- 



gave in He took the knock ! No more with jaunty air 

He'll have the " push " that made the punter stare ; 

^500 No more in monkeys now odds on he'll lay 

And make the ever grumbling fielder gay. 

opportunity One plunger more has had his little flare 

pay up And then came to Monday when he couldn't 

[" square" ; 
fellow Stripped of his plunees a poor denuded J 

He took the knock! 
Where is he now ? Ah ! echo answers " where " ? 

Upon the turf he had his little day 
mined And when, stone-broke, he could no longer 

[pay 

Leaving the ring to gnash its teeth and swear 
He took the knock! 



THE RHYME OF THE RUSHER 187 



THE RHYME OF THE RUSHER [Notes] 
[1892] 

[By Doss CHIDERDOSS in Sporting Times, 29 Oct. 
In Appropriate Rhyming Slanguage.}. 



I was out one night on the strict teetote, without drink 

'Cause I couldn't afford a drain; 

I was wearing a leaky I'm afloat, coat 

And it started to France and Spain. rain 

But a toff was mixed in a bull and cow, swell; row 

And I helped him to do a bunk ; get away 

He had been on the I'm so tap, and now ra ? 

He was slightly elephant's trunk. drunk 



ii 



He offered to stand me a booze, so I drink 
Took him round to the "Mug's Retreat;" 

And my round the houses I tried to dry trouse 

By the Anna Maria's heat. fif e 

He stuck to the I'm so to drown his cares, 

While I went for the far and near, be r 



1 88 THE RHYME OF THE RUSHER 

stairs Until the clock on the apples and pears 

warning Gave the office for us to clear. 

in 

Then round at the club we'd another bout, 

And I fixed him at nap until 
pockets I na d turned his skyrockets inside out, 

And had managed my own to fill, 
bounce Of course, I had gone on the half-ounce trick, 

And we quarrelled, and came to blows; 
But I fired him out of the Rory quick, 
nose And he fell on his I suppose. 

IV 

And he laid there, weighing out prayers for me, 
f eet Without hearing the plates of meat 

poiicemanjarrest- Of a slop, who pinched him for " d. and d." 

ed ; drunk and 

disorderly And disturbing a peaceful beat. 

eyes And I smiled as I closed my two mince pies 

In my insect promenade; 
him ; advantage For out of his nibs I had taken a rise, 

And his stay on the spot was barred. 



hair Next morning I brushed up my Barnet Fair, 

And got myself up pretty smart; 
Then I sallied forth with a careless air, 
heart And contented raspberry tart. 



THE RHYME OF THE RUSHER 189 

At the first big pub I resolved, if pos., possible 

That I'd sample my lucky star; 

So I passed a flimsy on to the boss banknote 

Who served drinks at the there you are. bar 

VI 

He looked at the note, and the air began 

With his language to pen and ink ; stink 

For the mug I'd fleeced had been his head man, fellow; cheated 

And had done him for lots of chink. robbed; money 

I'm blessed if my luck doesn't hum and ha, 

For I argued the point with skill; 
But the once a week made me go ta-ta beak 

For a month on the can't keep still. Thle&n 




190 WOT CHER! 



[Notes] WOT CHER! 

or, Knocked 'em in the Old Kent Rd. 
[1892] 

[By ALBERT CHEVALIER]. 



well-dressed man Last week down our alley come a toff, 
man Nice old geezer with a nasty cough, 

hat Sees my Missus, takes 'is topper off 

In a very gentlemanly way! 
"Ma'am," says he, "I 'ave some news to tell, 
Your rich Uncle Tom of Camberwell, 
died ; mistake Popped off recent, which it ain't a sell, 
Leaving you 'is little Donkey Shay. 
"Wot cher!" all the neighbours cried, 
" Who're yer goin' to meet, Bill ? 
Have yer bought the street, Bill?" 
Laugh ! I thought I should 'ave died, 
made them stare Knock'd 'em in the Old Kent Road ! 

ii 

donkey Some says nasty things about the moke, 

fellow One cove thinks 'is leg is really broke, 

That's 'is envy, cos we're carriage folk, 



WOT CHER! 191 

Like the toffs as rides in Rotten Row! 
Straight! it woke the alley up a bit, no mistake 

Thought our lodger would 'ave 'ad a fit, 
When my missus, who's a real wit, 

Says, " I 'ates a Bus, because it's low! " 
"Wot cher!" &c. 

in 

When we starts the blessed donkey stops, 

He won't move, so out I quickly 'ops, 

Pals start whackin' him, when down he drops, 

Someone says he wasn't made to go. 
Lor it might 'ave been a four-in-'and, 

My Old Dutch knOWS 'OW tO do the grand, wife; make a show 

First she bows, and then she waves 'er 'and, 
Calling out we're goin' for a blow ! 
"Wot cher!" &c. 

IV 

Ev'ry evenin' on the stroke of five, 
Me and Missus takes a little drive, 
You'd say, "Wonderful they're still alive," 

If you saw that little donkey go. 
I soon showed him that 'e 'd have to do 
Just whatever he was wanted to, 
Still I shan't forget that rowdy crew, 

'Ollerin' "Woa! steady! Neddy Woa! 
"Wot cher!" &c. 



192 OUR LITTLE NIPPER 



[Notes] OUR LITTLE NIPPER 



[By ALBERT CHEVALIER]. 



I'm just about the proudest man that walks, 
child I've got a little nipper, when 'e talks 

shillings ; pound I'll lay yer forty shiners to a quid 

You'll take 'im for the father, me the kid. 
Now as I never yet was blessed wi' wealf, 
I've 'ad to bring that youngster up myself, 
And though 'is education 'as been free, 
infamation 'E's allus 'ad the best of tips from me. 

And 'e's a little champion, 

[Notes] Do me proud well 'e's a knock out, 

Takes after me and ain't a bit too tall. 
'E calls 'is mother "Sally," 
And 'is father "good old pally," 
And 'e only stands about so 'igh, that's all! 

ii 

[Notes] 'E gits me on at skittles and 'e flukes, 
hands And when 'e wants to 'e can use 'is "dooks," 

You see 'im put 'em up, well there, it's great, 






OUR LITTLE NIPPER 193 

'E takes a bit of lickin at 'is weight; 

'E'll stick up like a Briton for 'is pals, 

An' ain't 'e just a terror with the gals ; 

I loves to see 'im cuttin' of a dash, 

A walkin' down our alley on the mash. courting 

There, 'e's a little champion, 
Do me proud well 'e's a knock out, 
I've knowed 'im take a girl on six foot tall ; 
'E'll git 'imself up dossy, dressy 

Say I'm goin' out wi' Flossie, 
An' 'e only stands about so 'igh, that's all. 

in 

I used to do a gin crawl e'vry night, round of gi 

An' very, very often come 'ome tight, drunk 

But now of all sich 'abits I've got rid, 

I allus wants to git 'ome to the kid. 

In teachin' 'im I takes a regular pride, 

Not books, of course, for them 'e can't abide, 

But artful little ikey little ways, funny 

As makes the people sit up where we stays. stare 

(Spoken] Only last Sunday me an' the missus 
took 'im out for a walk I should say 'e took 
us out. As we was a com in' 'ome I says to the 
old gal " Let's pop into the ' Broker's Arms ' and 
'ave a drop o' beer? " She didn't raise no 
objection so in we goes, followed by 'is nibs I'd 
forgotten all about 'im I goes to the bar and 

13 



194 OUR LITTLE NIPPER 

calls for two pots of four 'alf; suddenly I feels 
'im a tuggin' at my coat, " Wot's up ? " sez I ; 
"Wot did yer call for?" sez 'e; "Two pots of 
four 'alf," sez I; "Oh," sez 'e, "ain't mother 
goin' to 'ave none ? " 

Well, 'e's a little champion, 

Do me proud well 'e's a knock out, 

"Drink up," sez 'e, "Three pots, miss, it's 

I sez "Now Jacky, Jacky;" [my call." 

'E sez, "And a screw of baccy," 

And 'e only stands about so 'igh, that's all. 




THE COSTER'S SERENADE 195 



THE COSTER'S SERENADE [Notes] 

[1894] 

[By ALBERT CHEVALIER]. 



You ain't forgotten yet that night in May, 
Down at the Welsh 'Arp, which is 'Endon way, 
You fancied winkles and a pot of tea, 
" Four 'alf" I murmured's " good enough for me. " 
" Give me a word of 'ope that I may win" 
You prods me gently with the winkle pin 
We was as 'appy as could be that day 
Down at the Welsh 'Arp, which is 'Endon way. 

Oh, ' Arriet I'm waiting, waiting for you my dear, 

Oh, 'Arriet I'm waiting, waiting alone out here ; 

When that moon shall cease to shine, 

False will be this 'eart of mine, 

I'm bound to go on lovin' yer my dear; d'ye 'ear? 



n 



You ain't forgotten 'ow we drove that day 
Down to the Welsh 'Arp, in my donkey shay; 



196 THE COSTER'S SERENADE 

shout Folks with a "chy-ike" shouted, "Ain't they smart ?" 

You looked a queen, me every inch a Bart. 
Seemed that the moke was saying "Do me proud ;" 

finest; trap Mine is the nobbiest turn-out in the crowd; 

[Notes] ; swell Me in my " pearlies" felt a toff that day, 

Down at the Welsh 'Arp, which is Endon way. 
Oh, 'Arriet, &c. 

in 

Eight months ago and things is still the same, 
You're known about 'ere by your maiden name, 
chaffed I'm getting chivied by my pals 'cos why? 

Nightly I warbles 'ere for your reply. 
Summer 'as gone, and it's a freezin' now, 
Still love's a burnin' in my 'eart, I vow; 
Just as it did that 'appy night in May 
Down at the Welsh 'Arp, which is Endon way. 
Oh, 'Arriet, &c. 




NOTES 




Rhymes of the Canting Crew* 



THESE lines are of little interest apart from the 
fact of being the earliest known example of the 
Canting speech or Pedlar's French in English 
literature. Sorry in point or meaning, they are 
sorrier still as verse. Yet, antedating, by half a 
century or more, the examples cited by Awdeley 
and Harman, they possess a certain value they 
carry us back almost to the beginnings of Cant, 
at all events to the time when the secret language 
of rogues and vagabonds first began to assume 
a concrete form. 

Usually ascribed to Thomas Dekker (who " con- 
veyed " them bodily, and with errors, to Lanthorne 
and Candlelight, published in 1609) this jingle of 
popular Canting phrases, strung together almost 
at hap-hazaid, is the production of Robert Cop- 
land (15081547), the author of The Hye Way 
to the Spyttel House, a pamphlet printed after 1 535, 
and of which only two or three copies are now 
known. Copland was a printer-author; in the 

* Throughout these notes free use has been made of the Na- 
tional Dictionary of Biography ; a work which, without question, 
contains the latest and most accurately sifted array of biograph- 
ical information, much of which could not be obtained from any 
other source whatever. 



200 RHYMES OF THE CANTING CREW 

former capacity a pupil of Caxton in the office 
of Wynkyn de Worde. 

The plan of The Hye Way is simplicity 
itself. Copland, taking refuge near St. Bartholo- 
mew's Hospital during a passing shower, engages 
the porter in conversation concerning the "losels, 
mighty beggars and vagabonds, the michers, hedge- 
creepers, fylloks and luskes" that "ask lodging 
for Our Lord's sake". Thereupon is drawn a 
vivid and vigorous picture of the seamy side of 
the social life of the times. All grades of " vagrom 
men," with their frauds and shifts, are passed in 
review, and when Copland asks about their 
" bousy " speech, the porter entertains him with 
these lines. 

Lines 2 and 4. Bousy = drunken, sottish, dis- 
sipated. So Skelton in Elynoor Rommin (Harl. 
MSS. ed. Park, i. 416), 'Her face all bowsie\ 
Booze = to drink heavily, is still colloquial ; and, 
= to drink, was in use as early as A.D. 1300. 
Line 4. Cove (or Cofe] = a man, an individual. 
Maimed nace (nase or nazy] = helplessly drunk ; 
Lat. nausea = sickness ; cf. line 9, ' nace gere' . 
Line 5. Teare (toure or towre) = to look, to see. 
Patrying cove (patrico, patricove, or pattercove) 
= a strolling priest; cf. Awdeley, Frat. of Vaca- 
bondes (1560), p. 6.: "A Patriarke Co. doth 
make marriages, and that is untill death depart 
the married folke, which is after this sort : When 
they come to a dead Horse or any dead Gate 11, 
then they shake hands and so depart, euery one 
of them a seuerall way." The form patrying cove 
seems to suggest a derivation from 'pattering' or 
'muttering' the Pater-noster, up to the time of 
the Reformation, was recited by the priest in a 
low voice as far as 'and lead us not into temp- 
tation' when the choir joined in. Darkman 



THE BEGGAR'S CURSE 201 

cace (or case) = a sleeping apartment or place 
ward, barn, or inn : darkmans = night + Lat. 
casa = house etc.: 'mans' is a common canting 
affix = a thing or place : e.g. lightmans = day ; 
ruffmans = a wood or bush ; greenmans = the 
fields ; Chepemans = Cheapside market etc. Line 
6. docked the dell= deflowered the girl: dell = 
virgin; see Harman, Caveat (1575), p. 75: ' A dell 
is a yonge wenche, able for generation, and not 
yet knowen or broken by the upright man'. 
Coper meke (or make) = a half-penny. Line 7. His 
watch = he : my watch = I, or me : cf. ' his nabs ' 
and 'my nabs' in modern slang. Feng (A. S.) 
= to get, to steal, to snatch. Frounces nob- 
chete = prince's hat or cap : cheat (A. S.) = 
thing, and mainly used as an affix: thus, belly- 
chete = an apron; cackling-chete = a fowl; crash- 
ing-chetes = the teeth; nubbing-chete = the gal- 
lows, and so forth. Line 8. Cyarum, by Salmon 
the meaning of cyarum is unknown : by Salmon 
(or Solomon] = a beggar's oath, i.e., by the altar 
or mass. Pek my jere = eat excrement : cf, ' turd 
in your mouth'. Line 9. gan = mouth. My 
watch, see ante, line 7. Nace gere = nauseous 
stuff: cf. ante, line 4: gere generic for thing, 
stuff, or material. Line 10. bene bouse strong 
drink or wine. 



The Beggar's Curse 

Thomas Dekker, one of the best known of the 
Elizabethan pamphleteers and dramatists, was 
born in London about 1570, and began his 
literary career in 1597-8 when an entry referring 
to a loan-advance occurs in Henslowe's Diary. 
A month later forty shillings were advanced from 
the same source to have him discharged from 



202 "TOWRE OUT BEN MORTS" 

the Counter, a debtor's prison. Dekker was a 
most voluminous writer, and not always over- 
particular whence he got, or how he used, the 
material for his tracts and plays. The Belman 
of London Bringing to Light the Most Notorious 
Villanies that are now practised in the Kingdome 
(1608) of which three editions were published in 
one year, consists mainly of pilferings from Harman's 
Caveat for Common Cursetors first published in 
1566-7. He did not escape conviction, however, 
for Samuel Rowlands showed him up in Martin 
Mark- All. Yet another instance of wholesale 
" conveyance " is mentioned in the Note to "Cant- 
ing Rhymes" (ante). In spite of this shortcoming, 
however, and a certain recklessness of workman- 
ship, the scholar of to-day owes Dekker a world of 
thanks : his information concerning the social life 
of his time is such as can be obtained nowhere 
else, and it is, therefore, now of sterling value. 

Lanthorne and Candlelight is the second part 
of The Belman of London. Published also in 
1608, it ran to two editions in 1609, a fourth 
appearing in 1612 under the title of O per se O, 
or a new Cryer of Lanthorne and Candlelight, 
Being an Addition or Lengthening of the Belman 's 
Second Night Walke. Eight or nine editions of 
this second part appeared between 1608 and 
1648 all differing more or less from each other, 
another variation occurring when in 1637 Dekker 
republished Lanthorne and Candlelight under the 
title of English Villanies, shortly after which he 
is supposed to have died. 

"Towre Out Ben Morts" 

Samuel Rowlands, a voluminous writer circa 
1570 1628, though little known now, neverthe- 



"TOWRE OUT BEN MORTS" 203 

less kept the publishers busy for thirty years, his 
works selling readily for another half century. 
Not the least valuable of his numerous productions 
from a social and antiquarian point of view is 
Martin Mark- All, Beadle of Bridewell ; his Defence 
and Answere to the Belman of London (see both 
Notes ante). 

Martin Markall delivers himself of a vivid and 
" originall " account of " the Regiment of Rogues, 
when they first began to take head, and how 
they have succeeded one the other successively 
unto the sixth and twentieth year of King Henry 
the Eighth, gathered out of the Chronicle of 
Crackropes " etc. He then criticizes somewhat 
severely the errors and omissions in Dekker's 
Canting glossary, adding considerably to it, and 
finally joins issue with the Belman in an attempt 
to give "song for song". Dekker's "Canting 
Rhymes " (plagiarised from Copland) and " The 
Beggar's Curse " thus apparently gave birth to 
the present verses and to those entitled " The 
Maunder's Wooing" that follow. 

Stanza I, line i. Ben = Lat. bene = good. Mort 
= a woman, chaste or not. Line 3. Rome-cove 
= "a great rogue" (B. E., Diet. Cant. Crezv, 
1690), i.e., an organizer, or the actual perpetrator of 
a robbery : quire-cove = a subordinate thief the 
money had passed from the actual thief to his 
confederate. Rom (or rum) and quier (or queer] enter 
largely into combination, thus rom = gallant, fine, 
clever, excellent, strong ; rom-bouse = wine or 
strong drink ; rum-bite = a clever trick or fraud ; 
rum-blowen = a handsome mistress; rum-bung = 

full purse ; rum-diver = a clever pickpocket ; 
rum-padder = a well-mounted highwayman, etc. : 
also queere = base, roguish; queer-bung = an empty 
purse ; queer-cole bad money ; queer-diver a 



204 THE MAUNDER'S WOOING 

bungling pickpocket ; queer-ken = a prison ; queer- 
mart = a foundered whore, and so forth. Budge 
= a general verb of action, usually stealthy 
action : thus, budge a beak = to give the constable 
the slip, or to bilk a policeman; to budge out (or 
off} = to sneak off; to budge an alarm = to give 
warning. 

The Maunder's Wooing 

See previous Note. 

Stanza II, line 2. Autem mort = a wife; thus 
Harman, Caveat (1575): " These Autem Mortes 
be maried wemen, as there be but a fewe. For 
Autem in their Language is a Churche; so she 
is a wyfe maried at the Church, and they be as 
chaste as a Cowe I have, that goeth to Bull 
every moone, with what Bull she careth not." 
Line 5. wap = to lie carnally with. 

Stanza IV, line 5. Whittington = Newgate, 
from the famous Lord Mayor of London who 
left a bequest to rebuild the gaol. After standing 
for 230 years Whittington's building was demo- 
lished in 1666. 

Stanza V, line 2. Crackmans = hedges or 
bushes. Tip lowr with thy prat = (literally) get 
money with thy buttocks, i.e. by prostitution. 

Stanza VI, line I. Clapperdogen = (B. E. Diet. 
Cant. Crew, 1690) "a beggar born and bred"; 
also Harman, Caveat, etc. p. 44: "these go with 
patched clokes, and have their morts with them, 
which they call wives." 

"A Gage of ben Rom-bouse" 

Thomas Middleton, another of the galaxy of 
Elizabethan writers contributing so many side- 



"BING OUT, BIEN MORTS" 205 

lights on Shakspeare's life and times, is supposed 
to have been of gentle birth. He entered Gray's 
Inn about 1593 and was associated with Dekker 
in the production of The Roaring Girl, probably 
having the larger share in the composition. 
Authorities concur in tracing Dekker's hand in 
the canting scenes, but less certainly elsewhere. 
The original of Moll Cut-purse was a Mary Frith 
(1584 1659), tne daughter of a shoemaker in 
the Barbican. Though carefully brought up she 
was particularly restive under discipline, and 
finally became launched as a " bully, pickpurse, 
fortune-teller, receiver and forger " in all of which 
capacities she achieved considerable notoriety. 
As the heroine of The Roaring Girl Moll is 
presented in a much more favorable light than 
the facts warrant. 

Line n. And couch till a palliard docked my 
dell = (literally) ' And lie quiet while a beggar 
deflowered my girl ', but here probably = while 
a beggar fornicates with my mistress. 



"Bing Out, Bien Morts" 

[See Note to "The Beggar's Curse"]. Dekker 
introducing these verses affirms " it is a canting 
song not . . . composed as those of the Belman's 
were, out of his owne braine, but by the Canter's 
themselves, and sung at their meetings", in which, 
all things considered, Dekker is probably protest- 
ing overmuch. 

Stanza V, line 3. And wapping dell that 
niggles well = a harlot or mistress who " spreads " 
acceptably. 

Stanza IX, line 2. Sing out of the Rom-vile ; 



206 THE SONG OF THE BEGGAR 

i.e. to Tyburn, then the place of execution : 
Rom-vile = London. 

The Song of the Beggar 

The Description of Love is an exceedingly 
scarce little " garland " which first appeared in 
1620; but of that edition no copies are known to 
exist. Of the sixth edition, from which this 
example is taken, one copy is in the British 
Museum and another in the library collected by 
Henry Huth Esq. A somewhat similar ballad 
occurs in the Roxburgh Collection I, 42 (the 
chorus being almost identical), under the title of 
" The Cunning Northern Beggar". The complete 
title is A Description of Love. With certain Epi- 
grams, Elegies, and Sonnets. And also Mast, 
lo/mson's Answere to Mast. Withers. With the 
Crie of Ludgate, and the Song of the Begger. The 
sixth Edition. London, Printed by M. F. for 
FRANCIS COULES at the Upper end of the Old- 
Baily neere Newgate, 1629. 

Stanza II, line i. If a Bung be got by the 

Hie-latv, i.e. by Highway robbery. 

The Maunder's Initiation 

John Fletcher(i579 1625), dramatist, a younger 
son of Dr. Richard Fletcher afterwards bishop of 
London, by his first wife Elizabeth, was born in 
December 1579 at Rye in Sussex, where his 
father was then officiating as minister. A 'John 
Fletcher of London' was admitted 15 Oct. 1591 
a pensioner of Bene't (Corpus) College, Cambridge, 
of which college Dr. Fletcher had been president. 
Dyce assumes that this John Fletcher, who became 



THE HIGH PAD'S BOAST 207 

one of the bible-clerks in 1593, was the dramatist. 
Bishop Fletcher died, in needy circumstances, 
15 June 1596, and by his will, dated 26 Oct. 
1593, left his books to be divided between his 
sons Nathaniel and John. 

The Beggar s Bush was performed at Court at 
Christmas 1622, and was popular long after the 
Restoration. 

Fletcher was buried on 29 Aug. 1625 at St. 
Saviour's, Southwark. 'In the great plague, 1625,' 
says Aubrey (Letters written by Eminent Persons, 
vol. ii. pt. i. p. 352), 'a knight of Norfolk or 
Suffolk invited him into the countrey. He stayed 
but to make himselfe a suite of cloathes, and 
while it was makeing fell sick of the plague and 
died.' 



The High Pad's Boast 

See Note to "The Maunder's, Initiation", ante, 

The Merry Beggars 

Little is known of the birth or extraction of 
Richard Brome, and whether he died in 1652 
or 1653 is uncertain. For a time he acted as 
servant to Ben Jonson. The Jovial Crew was 
produced in 1641 at The Cock-pit, a theatre which 
stood on the site of Pitt Place running out of 
Drury Lane into Gt. Wild St. 

Stanza I, line 5. Go-well and Corn-well 
outgoing and incoming. 



208 A MORT'S DRINKING SONG 

A Mort's Drinking Song 

See Note to "The Merry Beggars," ante. 

"A Beggar I'll Be" 

This ballad is from the Bagford Collection 
which, formed by John Bagford (1651 1716), 
passed successively through the hands of James 
West (president of the Royal Society), Major 
Pearson, the Duke of Roxburghe and Mr. B. H. 
Bright, until in 1845 it and the more extensive 
Roxburghe Collection became the property of the 
nation. 

Stanza II, line i. Maunder = beggar. Line 
2. filer = pickpocket; flicker = thief. Line 3. 
canter = a tramping beggar or rogue. Line 4. 
lifter = a shop-thief. 

Stanza IV, line 8. Compter (or Counter], King's 
Bench, nor the Fleet, all prisons for debtors. 

Stanza V, line 6. jumble = to copulate. 

Stanza VIII, line 5. With Shinkin-ap- Morgan, 
with Blue-cap, or Teague = With a Welshman, 
Scotchman, or Irishman generic : as now are 
Taffy, Sandy, and Pat. 

A Budg and Snudg Song 

Chappell in Popular English Music of the Olden 
Time says that this song appears in The Canting 
Academy (2 nd ed. 1674) but the writer has been 
unable to find a copy of the book in question. 
The song was very popular, and many versions 
(all varying) are extant. The two given have 
been carefully collated. The portions in brackets 
[ ], for example stanza II, line 6, stanza III, 
lines 17, stanza IV, lines 5 8 etc. only appear 



THE MAUNDER'S. . . . MORT 209 

in the New Canting Diet. (1725). It was sung 
to the tune now known as There was a jolly millet 
once lived on the river Dee. 

Title. Budge = " one that slips into a house 
in the dark, and taketh cloaks, coats, or what 
comes next to hand, marching off with them" 
(B. E., Diet. Cant. Crezv, 1690). Snudge="onQ 
that lurks under a bed, to watch an opportunity 
to rob the house" (B. E., Did. Cant. Crew, 
1690). 

Stanza I, line 7. Whitt = Newgate (see Note 
p. 204). 

Stanza V, line 3. Jack Ketch, the public hang- 
man 1663 1686. 

The Maunder's Praise of His 
Strowling Mort 

The Triumph, of Wit by J. Shirley is a curious 
piece of bookmaking scissors and paste in 
the main which ran through many editions. 
Divided into three parts, the first two are chiefly 
concerned with "the whole art and mystery of 
love in all its nicest intrigues ", " choice letters 
with their answers " and such like matters. Part 
III contains " the mystery and art of Canting, 
with the original and present management thereof, 
and the ends to which it serves, and is employed : 
Illustrated with poems, songs and various intrigues 
in the Canting language with the explanation, 
etc." The songs were afterwards included in The 
New Canting Diet. (1725), and later on. in. Bacchus 
and Venus (1731). 

Title. Strowling Mort a beggar's trull : " pre- 
tending to be widows, sometimes travel the coun- 
tries . . . are light-fingered, subtle, hypocritical, 



2io THE RUM-MORT'S. . . . MAUNDER 

cruel, and often dangerous to meet, especially 
when the ruffler is with them " (B. E., Diet. Cant. 
Crew, 1690). 

Stanza I, line i. Doxy "These Boxes be 
broken and spoyled of their maydenhead by the 
upright men, and then they have their name of 
Boxes, and not afore. And afterwards she is 
commen and indifferent for any that wyll use 
her". Harman, Caveat, p. 73. Line 3. prats 
= buttocks or thighs. Line 4. wap = to copulate 
(also stanza IV, line i). 

Stanza II, line 4. clip and kiss = to copulate. 

The Rum-Mort's Praise of Her 
Faithless Maunder 

Obviously a companion song to the previous 
example: See Note ante. Rum-Mort = z beggar 
or gypsy queen. 

Stanza I, line i. Kinching-cove = (literally) a 
child or young lad: here as an endearment. 
Line 4. Clapperdogeon " The Paillard or Clap- 
perdogeons, are those that have been brought up 
to beg from their infancy, and frequently coun- 
terfeit lameness, making their legs, arms, and 
hands appear to be sore" Triumph of Wit, p. 185. 

Stanza II, line I. Dimber-damber = a chief 
man in the Canting Crew, or the head of a gang. 
Line 2. Palliard (See note Stanza I). Line 3. 
jockum =pen is. Line 4. glimmer = fire: here, a 
pox or clap. 

Stanza V, line I. crank (or counlerfeit-crank} 
" These that do counterfet the cranke be yong 
knaves and yonge harlots that deeply dissemble 
the falling sickness". (Harman, Caveat, 1814, 
p. 33). Line I. dommerar=& beggar feigning 



THE BLACK PROCESSION 211 

deaf and dumb. Line 2. rum-maunder = to feign 
madness. Line 3. Abram-cove = a beggar pretend- 
ing madness to cover theft. Line 4. Gybes well 
or license cleverly forged. 



The Black Procession 

See Note as to J. Shirley on page 209. 

Frisky Moll's Song 

John Harper (d. 1742), actor, originally per- 
formed at Bartholomew and Southwark fairs. On 
27 Oct. 1721 his name appears as Sir Epicure 
Mammon in the Alchemist at Drury Lane. 
Here he remained for eleven years, taking the 
parts of booby squires, fox-hunters, etc., proving 
himself what Victor calls 'a jolly facetious low 
comedian'. His good voice was serviceable in 
ballad opera and farce. On account of his 
'natural timidity', according to Davies, he was 
selected by Highmore, the patentee, in order to 
test the status of an actor, to be the victim of 
legal proceedings taken under the Vagrant Act, 
12 Queen Anne, and on 12 Nov. 1733 he was 
committed to Bridewell as a vagabond. On 20 
Nov. he came before the chief justice of the 
Kings Bench. It was pleaded on his behalf that 
he paid his debts, was well esteemed by persons 
of condition, was a freeholder in Surrey, and a 
householder in Westminster. He was discharged 
amid acclamations on his own recognisance. 

The Canter's Serenade 

The New Canting Dictionary (1725) is, in the 
main, a reprint of The Dictionary of the Canting 



212 "RETOURE MY DEAR DELL" 

Crew (c. 1696) compiled by B. E. The chief 
difference is that the former contains a collection 
of Canting Songs, most of which are included 
in the present collection. 

Stanza I, line 3. palliards see Note, p. 210, 
ten lines from bottom. 



"Retoure my dear dell" 

See Note to " The Canter's Serenade. " This 
song appears to be a variation of a much older 
one, generally ascribed to Chas II, entitled 1 
pass all my hours in a shady old grove. 



The Vain Dreamer 

See Note to "The Canter's Serenade." 

"When my Dimber Dell I Courted" 

See Note to " The Canter's Serenade. " The first 
two stanzas appear in a somewhat different form 
as "a new song" to the time of Beauty's Ruin 
in The Triumph of Wit (1707), of which the first 
stanza is as follows: 

When Dorinda first I courted, 

She had charms and beauty too; 
Conquering pleasures when she sported, 

The transport it was ever new : 
But wastful time do's now deceive her, 

Which her glories did uphold; 
All her arts can ne'er relieve her, 

Poor Dorinda is grown old. 



THE OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 213 

Stanza I, line 4. Wap the act of kind. 
Dimber dell = pretty wench "A dell is ayonge 
wenche, able for generation, and not yet knowen 
or broken by the upright man . . . when they have 
beene lyen with all by the upright man then they 
be Doxes, and no Dells." (HARMAN). 

Stanza III, line 3. Upright-men " the second 
rank of the Canting tribes, having sole right to 
the first night's lodging with the Dells." (B. E., 
Diet, Cant, Crew, 1696). 

The Oath of the Canting Crew 

Bamfylde Moore Carew, the King of the Gyp- 
sies, born in 1693, was the son of the Rector of 
Bickley, near Tiverton. It is related that to 
avoid punishment for a boyish freak he, with some 
companions, ran away and joined the gypsies. 
After a year and a half Carew returned for a 
time, but soon rejoined his old friends. His career 
was a long series of swindling and imposture, very 
ingeniously carried out, occasionally deceiving 
people who should have known him well. His 
restless nature then drove him to embark for 
Newfoundland, where he stopped but a short 
time, and on his return he pretended to be the 
mate of a vessel, and eloped with the daughter 
of a respectable apothecary of Newcastle on Tyne, 
whom he afterwards married. He continued his 
course of vagabond roguery for some time, and 
when Clause Patch, a king, or chief of the gyp- 
sies, died, Carew was elected his successor. He 
was convicted of being an idle vagrant, and sen- 
tenced to be transported to Maryland. On his 
arrival he attempted to escape, was captured, and 
made to wear a heavy iron collar, escaped again, 
and fell into the hands of some friendly Indians, 



214 OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 

who relieved him of his collar. He took an early 
opportunity of leaving his new friends, and got 
into Pennsylvania. Here he pretended to be a 
Quaker, and as such made his way to Philadel- 
phia, thence to New York, and afterwards to 
New London, where he embarked for England. 
He escaped impressment on board a man-of-war 
by pricking his hands and face, and rubbing in 
bay salt and gunpowder, so as to simulate small- 
pox. After his landing he continued his impostures, 
found out his wife and daughter, and seems to 
have wandered into Scotland about 1745, and is 
said to have accompanied the Pretender to Car- 
lisle and Derby. The record of his life from this 
time is but a series of frauds and deceptions, and 
but little is absolutely known of his career, except 
that a relative, Sir Thomas Carew of Hackern, 
offered to provide for him if he would give up 
his wandering life. This he refused to do, but 
it is believed that he eventually did so after he 
had gained some prizes in the lottery. The date 
of his death is uncertain. It is generally given, 
but on no authority, as being in 1770 but 'I. P.', 
writing from Tiverton, in Notes and Queries, 2nd 
series, vol. IV, p. 522, says that he died in 1758. 
The story of his life in detail is found in the well- 
known, and certainly much-printed, Life and Advent- 
ures of Bamfylde Moore Carew, the earliest edition 
of which (1745) describes him on the title-page as 
"the Noted Devonshire Stroller and Dogstealer". 
This book professes to have been " noted by 
himself during his passage to America", but though 
no doubt the facts were supplied by Carew him- 
self, the actual authorship is uncertain, though 
the balance of probability lies with Robert Goadby, 
a printer and compiler of Sherborne Dorsetshire, 
who printed an edition in 1749. A correspondent 
of Notes and Queries, however, states that Mrs. 



OATH OF THE CANTING CREW 215 

Goadby wrote it from Carew's dictation. [JW. and 
Q. 2 S iii. 4; iv. 330, 440, 522]. 

Line i. Crank Cuffin = Queer Cove = a rogue. 
Line g. Stop-hole Abbey, "the nick-name of the 
chief rendezvous of the Canting Crew". (B. E., 
Diet. Cant. Creev, 1696). Line 17. Abram = 
formerly a mendicant lunatic of Bethlehem Hos- 
pital who on certain days was allowed to go 
out begging : hence a -beggar feigning madness. 
Ruffler crack = an expert rogue. Line 18. Hooker 
= " peryllous and most wicked Knaves . . . for, as 
they walke a day times, from house to house, to 
demaund Charite . . . well noting what they see . . . 
that will they be sure to have . . . for they customably 
carry with them a staffe of V. of VI. foote long, 
in which within one ynch of the tope thereof, ys 
a lytle hole bored through, in which hole they 
putte an yron hoke, and with the same they wyll 
pluck unto them quickly anything that they may 
reche therewith." (Harman, Caveat, 1869^.35, 
36). Line 19. Prater = "such as beg with a 
sham-patent or brief for Spitals, Prisons, Fires, 
etc." (B. E.). Line 20. Irish toyle = a beggar-thief, 
working under pretence of peddling pins, lace, and 
such-like wares. Line ai. Dimber-damber = the 
chief of a gang: also an expert thief. Angler = 
hooker (see ante). Line 23. swigman = a beggar 
peddling haberdashery to cover theft and roguery. 
Clapperdogeon = a beggar born and bred, see 
note p. 210, tenth line from bottom. Line 24. 
Curtal "a curtail is much like to the upright 
man (that is, one in authority, who may " call to 
account ", " command a share ", chastise those 
under him, and "force any of their women to 
serve his turn"), but hys authority is not fully 
so great. He useth commonly to go with a short 
cloke, like to grey Friers, and his woman with 



216 " COME ALL YOU BUFFERS GAY " 

him in like livery, which he calleth his Altham 
if she be hys wyfe, and if she be his harlot, she is 
called hys Doxy. " (HARMAN). Line 26. Whip- 
jack = a rogue begging with a counterfeit license. 
Palliard = a beggar born and bred. Patrico = 
a hedge-priest. Line 26. Jarkman = " he that 
can write and reade, and sometime speake latin. 
He useth to make counterfaite licenses which 
they call gybes, and sets to scales, in their lan- 
guage called Jarkes. " (HARMAN). Line 27. Dom- 
merar = a rogue pretending deaf and dumb. 
Romany = a gipsy. Line 28. The family = the 
fraternity of vagabonds. 

"Come All You Buffers Gay" 

In the Roxburghe Collection (ii. 504) is a ballad 
upon which the present song is clearly based. 
It is called The West Country Nymph, or the 
little maid of Bristol to the time of Young Jemmy 
(i.e. the Duke of Monmouth, Charles II's natural 
son). The first stanza runs 

Come all you maidens fair, 

And listen to my ditty, 
In Bristol city fair 

There liv'd a damsel pretty. 

The Potato Man 

Stanza II, line 2. Cly = properly pocket, but 
here is obviously meant the contents. 

Stanza IV, line I. Blue bird's-eye = a blue and 
silk handkerchief with white spots. 

A Slang Pastoral 

Of R. Tomlinson nothing is known. The 
Dr. Byrom whose poem is here parodied is per- 






"YE SCAMPS, YE PADS, ETC." 217 

haps best remembered as the author of a once 
famous system of shorthand. He was born in 
1691, went to the Merchant Taylor's School, and 
at the age of 1 6 was admitted a pensioner of 
Trinity College Cambridge. It was here that he 
wrote My time, O ye muses. He died in 1763, 
and his poems, no inconsiderable collection, 
were published in 1773. 



"Ye Scamps, Ye Pads, Ye Divers" 

Stanza I, line I . The lay = a pursuit, a scheme : 
here = thievery and roguery in general. 

Stanza IV, line 4. Like Blackamore Othello &>c. 
the reference is to Othello, v. 2. " Yet she must 
die, else she'll betray more men. Put out the light, 
and then put out the light." 

The Sandman's Wedding 

Though George Parker's name is not formally 
attached to this "Cantata" there would appear 
little doubt, from internal evidence, that it, with 
the two songs immediately following, forms part 
of a characteristic series from the pen of this 
roving soldier-actor. Parker was born in 1732 
at Green Street, near Canterbury and was ' early 
admitted', he says, 'to walk the quarterdeck 
as a midshipman on board the Falmouth and 
the Guernsey'. A series of youthful indiscre- 
tions in London obliged him to leave the navy, 
and in or about 1754 to enlist as a common 
soldier in the 2Oth regiment of foot, the second 
battalion of which became in 1758 the 67th re- 
giment, under the command of Wolfe. In his 
regiment he continued a private, corporal, and 



218 THE SANDMAN'S WEDDING 

sergeant for seven years, was present at the 
siege of Belleisle, and saw service in Portugal, 
Gibraltar, and Minorca. At the end of the war 
he returned home as a supernumerary excise- 
man. About 1761 his friends placed him in the 
King's Head inn at Canterbury where he soon 
failed. Parker went upon the stage in Ire- 
land, and in company with Brownlow Ford, a 
clergyman of convivial habits, strolled over the 
greater part of the island. On his return to Lon- 
don he played several times at the Haymarket, 
and was later introduced by Goldsmith to Colman. 
But on account of his corpulence Colman de- 
clined his services. Parker then joined the pro- 
vincial strolling companies, and was engaged for 
one season with Digges, then manager of the 
Edinburgh Theatre. At Edinburgh he married an 
actress named Heydon, from whom, however, he 
was soon obliged to part on account of her 
dissolute life. Returning again to London, he 
set up as wandering lecturer on elocution, and 
in this character travelled with varying success 
through England. In November 1776 he set 
out on a visit to France, and lived at Paris for 
upwards of six months on funds supplied by his 
father. His resources being exhausted, he left 
Paris in the middle of July 1777 on foot. 
On reaching England he made another lecturing 
tour, which proved unsuccessful. His wit, humour, 
and knowledge of the world rendered him at one 
time an indispensable appendage to convivial 
gatherings of a kind; but in his later days he 
was so entirely neglected as to be obliged to sell 
gingerbread-nuts at fairs and race-meetings for a 
subsistance. He died in Coventry poorhouse in 
April 1800. 



THE HAPPY PAIR 219 

The Happy Pair 

and 

The Bunter's Christening 

and 

The Masqueraders 

See note (ante) to " The Sandman's Wedding ". 
Life's Painter etc. ran through several editions. 

The Flash Man of St Giles 

Stanza II, line 7. Drunk as David's sozv=bea.st\y 
drunk. Grose (Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar 
Tongue] says : One David Lloyd, a Welshman, who 
kept an ale-house at Hereford, had a sow with six 
legs, which was an object of great curiosity. One 
day David's wife, having indulged too freely, lay 
down in the sty to sleep, and a company coming 
to see the sow, David led them to the sty, saying, 
as usual, " There is a sow for you ! Did you 
ever see the like?" One of the visitors replied, 
" Well, it is the drunkenest sow I ever beheld." 
Whence the woman was ever after called " Davy's 
sow." 

A Leary Mot 

Stanza III, line i. Cock and Hen Club = a 
free-and-easy for both sexes. 

Stanza IV, line 4. Tom Cribb see note p. 223. 



220 THE NIGHT BEFORE LARRY, ETC. 



"The Night Before Larry was Stretched" 

Neither the authorship nor the date of these 
inimitable verses are definitely known. According 
to the best authorities, Will Maher, a shoemaker 
of Waterford, wrote the song. Dr. Robert Bur- 
rowes, Dean of St. Finbar's Cork, to whom it has 
been so often attributed, certainly did not. Often 
quoted in song book and elsewhere. Francis 
Sylvester Mahony, better known as "Father 
Prout" contributed to Prater's Magazine the 
following translation into the French. 

La mort de Socrate. 

Par I' Abbe de Prout, Cure' du Mont-aux- Cressons, 
pres de Cork. 

A la veille d'etre pendu, 
Notr' Laurent re9ut dans son gite, 

Honneur qui lui etait bien du, 
De nombreux amis la visite; 

Car chacun scavait que Laurent 
A son tour rendrait la pareille, 

Chapeau montre, et veste engageant, 
Pour que 1'ami put boire bouteille, 

Ni faire, a gosier sec, le saut 

" Helas, notre gar9on!" lui dis-je, 
" Combien je regrette ton sort ! 

Te voila fleur, que sur sa tige 
Moisonne la cruelle mort!" 

"Au diable," dit-il, "le roi George! 
Ca me fait la valeur d'un bouton; 

Devant le boucher qui m'egorge, 
Je serai comme un doux mouton, 

Et saurai montrer du courage!" 



LA MORT DE SOCRATE 221 

Des amis deja la cohorte 
Remplissait son etroit reduit: 

Six chandelles, ho! qu'on apporte, 
Donnons du lustre a cette nuit! 

Alors je cherchai a connaitre 
S'il s'etait dument repenti? 

"Bah! c'est les fourberies des pretres 
Les gredins, ils en ont menti, 

Et leurs contes d'enfer sont faux!" 

L'on demande les cartes. Au jeu 
Laurent voit un larron qui triche; 

D'honneur tout rempli, il prend feu, 
Et du bon coup de poign 1'affiche. 

" Ha, coquin ! de mon dernier jour 
Tu croyais profiler, peut-etre; 

Tu oses me jouer ce tour! 
Prends ca pour ta peine, vil traitre! 

Et apprends a te bien conduire!" 

Quand nous eumes cesse nos ebats, 
Laurent, en ce triste repaire 

Pour le disposer au trepas, 
Voit entrer Monsieur le Vicaire. 

Apres un sinistre regard, 
Le front de sa main il se frotte, 

Disant tout haut, "Venez plus tard!" 
Et tout bas, "Vilaine calotte!" 

Puis son verre il vida deux fois. 

Lors il parla de 1'echaufaud, 
Et de sa derniere cravate; 

Grands dieux ! que 9a paraissait beau 
De la voir mourir en Socrate ! 

Le trajet en chantant il fit 
La chanson point ne fut un pseaume; 

Mais palit un peu quand il vit 
La statute de Roy Guillaume 

Les pendards n'aiment pas ce roi! 



222 THE SONG OF THE YOUNG PRIG 

Quand fut au bout de son voyage, 
Le gibet fut pret en un clin : 

Mourant il tourna de visage 
Vers la bonne ville de Dublin. 

II dansa la carmagnole, 
Et mourit comme fit Malbrouck; 

Puis nous enterrames le drole 
Au cimetiere de Donnybrook 

Que son ame y soit en repos! 

Stanza V, line 3. Kilmainham, a gaol near 
Dublin. 

Stanza VI, line 7. King William, the statute 
of William III erected on College Green in 
commemoration of the Battle of the Boyne. It 
was long the object of much contumely on the 
part of the Nationalists. It was blown to pieces 
in 1836, but was subsequently restored. 

The Song of the Young Prig 

Said to have been written by Little Arthur 
Chambers, the Prince of Prigs, who was one of 
the most expert thieves of his time. He began 
to steal when he was in petticoats, and died a 
short time before Jack Sheppard came into notice. 
Internal evidence, however, renders this attributed 
authorship very improbable. 

Stanza I, line i. Dyofs Isle, i.e., Dyot St., St. 
Giles, afterwards called George St. Bloomsbury, 
was a well-known rookery where thieves and 
their associates congregated. 

Stanza II, line 3. And I my reading learnt 
betime From study ing pocket-books. " Pocket-book" 
= reader. 



THE MILLING MATCH 223 

Stanza IV, line i. To work capital = to commit 
a crime punishable with death. Previous to 1829 
many offences, now thought comparatively trivial, 
were deemed to merit the extreme penalty of the 
law. 

The Milling Match 

Tom CribUs Memorial to Congress : With a 
Preface, Notes, and Appendix. By One of the 
Fancy. London, Longmans & Co., 1819. There 
were several editions. Usually, with good reason, 
ascribed to Thomas Moore. It may be remarked 
that, though the Irish Anacreon's claim to fame 
rests avowedly on his more serious contributions 
to literature, he was, nevertheless, never so popular 
as when dealing with what, in the early part of 
the present century, was known as THE FANCY. 
Pugilism then took the place, in the popular mind, 
that football and cricket now occupy. Tom Cribb 
was born at Hanham in the parish of Bitton, 
Gloucestershire, in 1781, and coming to London 
at the age of thirteen followed the trade of a 
bell-hanger, then became a porter at the public 
wharves, and was afterwards a sailor. From the 
fact of his having worked as a coal porter he 
became known as the 'Black Diamond,' and under 
this appellation he fought his first public battle 
against George Maddox at Wood Green on 7 
Jan. 1805, when after seventy-six rounds he was 
proclaimed the victor, and received much praise 
for his coolness and temper under very unfair 
treatment. In 1807 he was introduced to Captain 
Barclay, who, quickly perceiving his natural good 
qualities, took him in hand, and trained him under 
his own eye. He won the championship from 
Bob Gregson in 1808 but in 1809 he was beaten 
by Jem Belcher. He subsequently regained the 



224 YA-HIP, MY HEARTIES! 

belt. After an unsuccessful venture as a coal 
merchant at Hungerford Wharf, London, he 
underwent the usual metamorphosis from a pugilist 
to a publican, and took the Golden Lion in South- 
wark; but finding this position too far eastward 
for his aristocratic patrons he removed to the 
King's Arms at the corner of Duke Street and 
King Street, St. James's, and subsequently, in 1828, 
to the Union Arms, 26 Panton Street, Haymarket. 
On 24 Jan. 1821 it was decided that Cribb, 
having held the championship for nearly ten years 
without receiving a challenge, ought not to be 
expected to fight any more, and was to be per- 
mitted to hold the title of champion for the 
remainder of his life. On the day of the corona- 
tion of George IV, Cribb, dressed as a page, was 
among the prizefighters engaged to guard the 
entrance to Westminster Hall. His declining years 
were disturbed by domestic troubles and severe 
pecuniary losses, and in 1839 ne was obliged to 
give up the Union Arms to his creditors. He 
died in the house of his son, a baker in the High 
Street, Woolwich, on n May 1848, aged 67, and 
was buried in Woolwich churchyard, where, in 
1851, a monument representing a lion grieving 
over the ashes of a hero was erected to his me- 
mory. As a professor of his art he was match- 
less, and in his observance of fair play he was 
never excelled; he bore a character of unim- 
peachable integrity and unquestionable humanity. 

Ya Hip, My Hearties! 

Stanza III, line 8. Houyhnhnms. A race of 
horses endowed with human reason, and bearing 
rule over the race of man a reference to Dean 
Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726). 



SONNETS FOR THE FANCY 225 



Sonnets for The Fancy 

Pierce Egan, the author of the adventures of 
Tom and Jerry was born about 1772 and died 
in 1849. He had won his spurs as a sporting 
reporter by 1812, and for eleven years was recog- 
nised as one of the smartest of the epigrammatists, 
song-writers, and wits of the time. Boxiana, a 
monthly serial, was commenced in 1818. It con- 
sisted of 'Sketches of Modern Pugilism', giving 
memoirs and portraits of all the most celebrated 
pugilists, contemporary and antecedent, with full 
reports of their respective prize-fights, victories, 
and defeats, told with so much spirited humour, 
yet with such close attention to accuracy, that 
the work holds a unique position. It was con- 
tinued in several volumes, with copperplates, to 
1824. At this date, having seen that Londoners 
read with avidity his accounts of country sports 
and pastimes, he conceived the idea of a similar 
description of the amusements pursued by sporting 
men in town. Accordingly he announced the 
publication of Life in London in shilling numbers, 
monthly, and secured the aid of George Cruik- 
shank, and his brother, Isaac Robert Cruik- 
shank to draw and engrave the illustrations 
in aquatint, to be coloured by hand. George IV 
had caused Egan to be presented at court, and 
at once accepted the dedication of the forthcoming 
work. This was the more generous on the king's 
part because he must have known himself to have 
been often satirised and caricatured mercilessly 
in the Green Bag literature by G. Cruikshank, 
the intended illustrator. On 15 July 1821 appeared 
the first number of Life in London; or, 'The 
Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, Esq., 
and his elegant friend, Corinthian Jem, accom- 

15 



226 SONNETS FOR THE FANCY 

panied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in their 
Rambles and Sprees through the Metropolis.' 
The success was instantaneous and unprecedented. 
It took both town and country by storm. So 
great was the demand for copies, increasing with 
the publication of each successive number, month 
by month, that the colourists could not keep 
pace with the printers. The alternate scenes of 
high life and low life, the contrasted characters, 
and revelations of misery side by side with pro- 
digal waste and folly, attracted attention, while 
the vivacity of dialogue and description never 
flagged. 

Stanza III, line 10. New Drop. The extreme 
penalty of the law, long carried out at Tyburn 
(near the Marble Arch corner of Hyde Park), 
was ultimately transferred to Newgate. The 
lament for " Tyburn's merry roam " was, without 
doubt, heart-felt and characteristic. Executions 
were then one of the best of all good excuses 
for a picnic and jollification. Yet the change of 
scene to Newgate does not appear to have 
detracted much from these functions as shows. 
" Newgate to-day, " says a recent writer in The 
Daily Mail, is little wanted, and all but vacant, 
as a general rule. In former days enormous 
crowds were herded together indiscriminately 
young and old, innocent and guilty, men, women, 
and children, the heinous offender, and the neo- 
phyte in crime. The worst part of the prison 
was the " Press Yard," the place then allotted 
to convicts cast for death. There were as many 
as sixty or seventy sometimes within these narrow 
limits, and most were kept six months and more 
thus hovering between a wretched existence and 
a shameful death. Men in momentary expecta- 
tion of being hanged rubbed shoulders with 



THE TRUE BOTTOMED BOXER 227 

others still hoping for reprieve. If the first were 
seriously inclined, they were quite debarred from 
private, religious meditation, but consorted, per- 
force, with reckless ruffians, who played leap-frog, 
and swore and drank continually. Infants of 
tender years were among the condemned; luna- 
tics, too, raged furiously through the Press Yard, 
and were a constant annoyance and danger to 
all. The " condemned sermon " in the prison 
chapel drew a crowd of fashionable folk, to stare 
at those who were to die, packed together in a 
long pew hung with black, and on a table in 
front was placed an open coffin. Outside, in 
the Old Bailey, on the days of execution, the 
awful scenes nearly baffle description. Thousands 
collected to gloat over the dying struggles of the 
criminals, and fought and roared and trampled 
each other to death in their horrible eagerness, 
so that hundreds were wounded or killed. Ten 
or a dozen were sometimes hanged in a row, 
men and women side by side. 

The True Bottomed Boxer 

The Universal Songster, or Museum of Mirth: 
forming the most complete collection of ancient 
and modern songs in the English language, with 
a classified Index . . . Embellished with a Frontis- 
piece and wood cuts, designed by George Cruik- 
shank etc. 3vols. London, 1825-26. 8vo. 

Stanza I, line i. Moulsey- Hurst rig = a prize- 
fight: Moulsey- Hurst, near Hampton Court, was 
long a favorite venue for pugilistic encounters. 
Line 3. Fibbing a nob is most excellent gig = 
getting in a quick succession of blows on the 
head is good fun. Line 4. Kneading the dough = 
a good pummelling. Line 6. Belly- go-firsters = 



228 BOBBY AND HIS MARY 

an initial blow, generally given in the stomach. 
Line 8. Measuring mugs for a chancery job = 
getting the head under the arm or ' in chancery '. 

Stanza II, line i. Flooring = downing (a man). 
Flushing = delivering a blow right on the mark, 
and straight from the shoulder. Line 5. Cross- 
ing = unfair fighting; shirking. 

Stanza III, line 5. Victualling-office = the 
stomach. Line 6. Smeller and ogles = nose and 
eyes. Line 7. Bread-basket = stomach. Line 8. 
In twig = in form; ready. 

Bobby and His Mary 

[See ante for note on Universal Songster}. 
Stanza I, line i. Dyot Street, see note page 222. 

Stanza II, line 16. St, Pulchre's bell, the great 
bell of St. Sepulchre's Holborn, close to Newgate, 
always begins to toll a little before the hour 
of execution, under the bequest of Richard Dove, 
who directed that an exhortation should be made 
to " . . . . prisoners that are within, Who for 
wickedness and sin are appointed to die, Give 
ear unto this passing bell." 

Poor Luddy 

Thomas John Dibdin (1771 1841), the author 
of this song, was an actor and dramatist an 
illegitimate son of Charles Dibdin the elder. He 
claimed to have written nearly 2000 songs. 



THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 229 



The Pickpocket's Chaunt 

Eugene Frai^ois Vidocq was a native of Arras, 
where his father was a baker. From early 
associations he fell into courses of excess which 
led to his flying from the paternal roof. After 
various, rapid, and unexampled events in. the 
romance of real life, in which he was everything 
by turns and nothing long, he was liberated from 
prison, and became the principal and most active 
agent of police. He was made chief of the Police 
de Surete under Messrs. Delavau and Franchet, 
and continued in that capacity from the year 
1810 till 1827, during which period he extirpated 
the most formidable gangs of ruffians to whom 
the excesses of the revolution and subsequent 
events had given full scope for daring robberies 
and iniquitous excesses. He settled down as a 
paper manufacturer at St. Mande near Paris. 

Of Maginn (17931842) it may be said he 
was, without question, one of the most versatile 
writers of his time. He is, perhaps, best remem- 
bered in connection with the Nodes Ambrosiance, 
which first appeared in Blackwood, and with the 
idea of which Maginn is generally credited. He 
was also largely concerned with the inception of 
Eraser's. Maginn's English rendering of Vidocq's 
famous song first appeared in Blackwood for July 
1829. For the benefit of the curious the ori- 
ginal is appended. It will be seen that Maginn was 
very faithful to his copy. 



230 THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 

EN roulant de vergne en vergne l 
Pour apprendre a goupiner, a 
J'ai rencontre la mercandiere, 8 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Qui du pivois solisait, 4 
Lonfa malura donde. 

J'ai rencontre la mercandiere 
Qui du pivois solisait; 
Je lui jaspine en bigorne; B 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Qu'as tu done a morfiller? 6 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Je lui jaspine en bigorne; 
Qu'as tu done a morfiller? 
J'ai du chenu 7 pivois sans lance. 8 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et du larton savonne 9 
Lonfa malura donde. 

J'ai du chenu pivois sans lance 
Et du larton savonne, 
Une lourde, 10 une tournante, n 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et un pieu 12 pour roupiller 18 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Une lourde, une tournante 
Et un pieu pour roupiller. 
J'enquille u dans sa cambriole, 15 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Esperant de 1'entifler, 16 
Lonfa malura donde. 

1 Vergne, town. Larton savonne, white 

* Goupiner, to steal. bread. 

* Mercandiere, tradeswomen. lo Lourde, door. 

' Du pivois solisait, sold wine. " Tournante, key. 

* Jaspine en bigorne, say in " Pieu, bed. 

cant. " Roupiller, to sleep. 

1 Morfiller, to eat and drink. '* J'enquille, / enter. 

* Chenu, good. " Cambriole, room. 

1 Lance, water. " Entifler, to marry. 



J'enquille dans sa cambriole 
Esperant de 1'entifler; 
Je rembroque 1 au coin du rifle, a 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Un messiere 8 qui pion9ait, 4 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Je rembroque au coin du rifle 
Un messiere qui pionsait; 
J'ai sonde dans ses vallades, 5 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Son carle 6 j'ai pessigue, 7 
Lonfa malura donde. 

J'ai sonde dans ses vallades, 
Son carle j'ai pessigue, 
Son carle et sa tocquante, 8 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et ses attaches de ce, 9 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Son carle et sa tocquante, 
Et ses attaches de ce, 
Son coulant 10 et sa montante, 11 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et son combre galuche 12 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Son coulant et sa montante 
Et son combre galuche, 
Son frusque, 1S aussi sa lisette, 14 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et ses tirants brodanches, 15 
Lonfa malura donde. 

' Rembroque, see. ' Attaches de ce, silver buckles 



* Rifle, fire, 

8 Mosisere, man. 

4 Pioncait, was sleeping. 

8 Vallades, pockets. 

' Carle, money. 

' Pessigue, taken. 



Coulant, chain 
Montante, breeches. 
Combre galuche, laced hat. 
* Frusque, coat. 

4 Lisette, -waistcoat. 

5 Tirants brodanches, em- 



Tocquante, -watch. broidered stockings. 



232 THE PICKPOCKET'S CHAUNT 

Son frusque, aussi sa lisette 
Et ses tirants brodanches. 
Crompe, 1 crompe, mercandiere, 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Car nous serions bequilles, 2 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Crompe, crompe, mercandiere, 
Car nous serions bequilles. 
Sur la placarde de vergne, 3 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
II nous faudrait gambiller, * 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Sur la placarde de vergne 
II nous faudrait gambiller, 
Allumes B de toutes ces largues, 6 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et du trepe 7 rassemble, 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Allumes de toutes ces largues 
Et du trepe rassemble; 
Et de ces chariots bons drilles, 8 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Tous aboulant 9 goupiner. 
Lonfa malura donde. 



Stanza XIII, line 5. Cotton, the ordinary at 
Newgate. 



1 Crompe, run away. * Largues, women. 

* Bequilles, hanged. ' Trepe, crowd. 

* Placarde de vergne, public * Chariots bons drilles, jolly 

place. thieves. 

* Gambiller, to dance. ' Aboulant, coming: 
8 Allumes, stared at. 



ON THE PRIGGING LAY 233 

On the Prigging Lay 

H. T. R., the English translator of Vidocq's 
Memoirs (4 vol., 1828-9), savs f this and the 
following renderings from the French that they 
"with all their faults and all their errors, are to 
be added to the list of the translator's sins, who 
would apologise to the Muse did he but know 
which of the nine presides over Slang poetry." 
The original of " On the Prigging Lay " is as 
follows : 

Un jour a la Croix- Rouge 
Nous etions dix a douze 

(She interrupted herself with " Comme 

a 1'instant meme.") 
Nous etions dix & douze 
Tous grinches de renom, * 
Nous attendions la sorgue z 
Voulant poisser des bogues 8 
Pour faire du billon. * (bis) 

Partage ou non partage 
Tout est a notre usage; 
N'epargnons le poitou 6 
Poissons avec adresse 6 
Messieres et gonzesses 7 
Sans faire de regout. 8 (bis) 

Dessus le pont au change 
Certain argent-de-change 
Se criblait au charron, 9 
J'engantai sa toquante 10 
Ses attaches brillantes ll 
Avec ses billemonts. la (bis) 

Thieves. ' Citizen and wife. 

Night. 8 Awaken suspicion. 

Watches. Cried "Thief." 

Money. 10 I took his watch. 

Let us be cautious. n His diamond buckles. 

Let us rob. " His bank notes. 



234 ON THE PRIGGING LAY 

Quand douze plombes crossent, 
Ses pegres s'en retournant z 
Au tapis de Montron 3 
Montron ouvre ta lourde, * 
Si tu veux que j'aboule, 5 
Et piausse en ton bocsin. 6 (bis) 

Montron drogue a sa larque, 7 
Bonnis-moi done girofle 8 
Qui sont ces pegres-la ? 9 
Des grinchisseurs de bogues, 10 
Esquinteurs de boutoques, " 
Les connobres tu pas? la (bis) 

Et vite ma culbute; 18 
Quand je vois mon affure 14 
Je suis toujours pare 15 
Du plus grand coeur du monde 
Je vais a la profonde 16 
Pour vous donner du frais. (bis} 



Mais deja la patrarque, 17 
Au clair de la moucharde, 18 
Nous reluge de loin. 19 
L'aventure est etrange, 
C'etait 1'argent-de-change, 
Que suivait les roussins. 20 (bis] 



1 Twelve oclock strikes. " Burglars. 

* The thieves. ' Do you not know them) 

* At the cabaret. " Breeches. 

* Your door. '* Profit. 
" Give money. ' Ready. 

* Sleep at your house. " Cellar. 
' Asks his wife. " Patrol. 

' Say, my love. " The moon. 

* These thieves. " Looks at us. 
10 Watch stealers. "> Spies. 



THE LAG'S LAMENT 235 

A des fois Ton rigole * 
Ou bien Ton pavillonne a 
Qu'on devrait lansquiner 8 
Raille, griviers, et cognes 4 
Nous ont pour la cigogne B 
Tretons marrons paumes. 6 (bis) 

The Lag's Lament 



See Note ante, "On the Prigging Lay", 
original runs as follows: 

Air: UHeureux Pilote. 

Travaillant d'ordinaire, 
La sorgue dans Pan tin, 7 
Dans mainte et mainte affaire 
Faisant tres-bon choppin, 8 
Ma gente cambriote, 9 
Rendoublee de camelotte, 10 
De la dalle au flaquet; ll 
Je vivais sans disgrace, 
Sans regout ni morace, ls 
Sans taff et sans regret. 18 

J'ai fait par comblance u 
Giroude larguecape, 15 
Soiffant picton sans lance, 16 
Pivois non maquille, 17 
Tirants, passe a la rousse, 18 
Attaches de gratouse, 19 



The 



Laughs. 
Jokes. 
To weep. 

Exempt, soldiers and gen- 
darmes. 

Palace of justice. 
Taken in the act. 
Evening in Paris. 
A good booty. 
Chamber. 
Full of goods. 



Money in the pocket. 

Without fear or uneasi- 
ness. 

Without care. 

An increase. 

A handsome mistress. 

Drinking wine without 
water. 

7 Unadulterated wine. 

8 Stockings. 
* Lace. 



236 THE LAG'S LAMENT 

Combriot galuche. * 
Cheminant en bon drille, 
Un jour a la Courtille 
Je m'en etais engante. a 

En faisant nos gambades, 
Un grand messiere franc, 3 
Voulant faire parade, 
Serre un bogue d'orient. * 
Apres la gambriade, B 
Le filant sur 1'estrade, 6 
D'esbrouf je 1'estourbis, 7 
J'enflaque sa limace, 8 
Son bogue, ses frusques, ses passes, 9 
Je m'en fus au fourallis. 10 

Par contretemps, ma largue, 
Voulant se piquer d'honneur, 
Craignant que je la nargue 
Moi que n' suis pas taffeur, u 
Pour gonfler ses valades 
Encasque dans un rade 12 
Sert des sigues a foison 13 
On la crible a la grive, u 
Je m' la donne et m' esquive, 16 
Elle est pommee maron. 16 

Le quart d'oeil lui jabotte 17 
Mange sur tes nonneurs, 18 
Lui tire une carotte 
Lui montant la couleur. 19 

Laced hat. lo The receiving house. 

9 Clad. " Coward. 

8 Citizen. Enters a shop. 

* A gold watch. '" Steals money. 

1 Dance. " They call for the guard. 

' Following him in the bou- " I fly. 

levard. " Taken in the fact. 

I stun him. " The commissary questions 

* I take off his shirt. him. 

* I steal his watch, clothes u Denounces his accomplices. 

and shoes. Tell a falsehood. 



NIX MY DOLL, PALS, ETC." 237 

L'on vient, on me ligotte, * 

Adieu, ma cambriote, 

Mon beau pieu, mes dardants 2 

Je monte a la cigogne, 3 

On me gerbe a la grotte, * 

Au tap et pour douze ans. B 

Ma largue n' sera plus gironde, 
Je serais vioc aussi; 6 
Faudra pour plaire au monde, 
Clinquant, frusque, maquis. 7 
Tout passe dans la tigne, 8 
Et quoiqu'on en juspine. 9 
C'est un f flanchet, 10 
Douze longes de tirade, ll 
Pour un rigolade, 12 
Pour un moment d'attrait. 

Stanza II, line 2. So gay, so nutty and so 
knowing See Don Juan, Canto XI, stanza . . . 

Stanza VI, line i. Sir Richard Birnie the chief 
magistrate at Bow St. 

"Nix my Doll, Pals, Fake Away" 

Ainsworth in his preface to Rookwood makes the 
following remarks on this and the three following 
songs : " As I have casually alluded to the flash 
song of Jerry Juniper, I may be allowed to make 
a few observations upon this branch of versifica- 
tion. It is somewhat curious with a dialect so 

They tie me. ' Rouge. 

My fine bed, my loves. In this world. 

The dock. * Whatever people say. 

They condemn my to the 10 Lot. 

galleys. " Twelve years of fetters. 

To exposure. " Fool. 
Old. 



238 " NIX MY DOLL, PALS, ETC." 

racy, idiomatic, and plastic as our own cant, that 
its metrical capabilities should have been so little 
essayed. The French have numerous chansons 
d' argot, ranging from the time of Charles Bourdigne 
and Villon down to that of Vidocq and Victor 
Hugo, the last of whom has enlivened the horrors 
of his ' Dernier Jour d'un Condamne" by a fes- 
tive song of this class. The Spaniards possess a 
large collection of Romances de Germania, by 
various authors, amongst whom Quevedo holds a 
distinguished place. We on the contrary, have 
scarcely any slang songs of merit. This barreness 
is not attributable to the poverty of the soil, but 
to the want of due cultivation. Materials are at 
hand in abundance, but there have been few 
operators. Dekker, Beaumont and Fletcher, and 
Ben Jonson, have all dealt largely in this jargon, 
but not lyrically; and one of the earliest and 
best specimens of a canting-song occurs in 
Brome's ' Jovial Creiv /' and in the ' Adventures 
of Bamfylde Moore Carew' there is a solitary 
ode addressed by the mendicant fraternity to their 
newly-elected monarch; but it has little humour, 
and can scarcely be called a genuine canting- 
song. This ode brings us down to our own time ; 
to the effusions of the illustrious Pierce Egan; to 
Tom Moore's Flights of 'Fancy ; ' to John Jackson's 
famous chant, ' On the High Toby Spice flash the 
Muzzle? cited by Lord Byron in a note to 'Don 
Juan ; ' and to the glorious Irish ballad, worth 
them all put together, entitled 'The Night before 
Larry was stretched? This is attributed to the 
late Dean Burrowes, of Cork. [See Note, p. 220 Ed.]. 
It is worthy of note, that almost all modern as- 
pirants to the graces of the Musa Pedestris are 
Irishmen. Of all rhymesters of the ' Road,' how- 
ever, Dean Burrowes is, as yet, most fully entitled 
to the laurel. Larry is quite ' the potato ! ' 



THE GAME OF HIGH TOBY 239 

"I venture to affirm that I have done some- 
thing more than has been accomplished by my 
predecessors, or contemporaries, with the signifi- 
cant language under consideration. I have written 
a purely flash song ; of which the great and peculiar 
merit consists in its being utterly incomprehensible 
to the uninformed understanding, while its meaning 
must be perfectly clear and perspicuous to the 
practised patterer of Romany, or Pedler's French. 
I have, moreover, been the first to introduce and 
naturalize amongst us a measure which, though 
common enough in the Argotic minstrelsy of 
France, has been hitherto utterly unknown to 
our pedestrian poetry." How mistaken Ainsworth 
was in his claim, thus ambiguously preferred, the 
present volume shows. Some years after the song 
alluded to, belter known under the title of ' Nix 
my dolly, pals, fake away!' sprang into extra- 
ordinary popularity, being set to music by Rodwell, 
and chanted by glorious Paul Bedford and clever 
little Mrs. Keeley. 



The Game of High Toby 

and 
The Double Cross 

See note to "Nix my Doll, Pals, etc.," ante. 

The House Breaker's Song 

G. W. M. Reynolds followed closely on the 
heels of Dickens when the latter scored his great 
success in The Pickwick Papers. He was a most 
voluminous scribbler, but none of his productions 
are of high literary merit. 



2 4 o THE FAKING BOY ... IS GONE 

The Faking Boy to the Crap is gone 

The Nutty Blowen 
The Faker's New Toast 

and 
My Mother 

" Bon Gualtier " was the joint nom-de-plurne of 
W. E. Aytoun and Sir Theodore Martin. Between 
1840 and 1844 they worked together in the pro- 
duction of The Bon Gualtier Ballads, which acquired 
such great popularity that thirteen large editions 
of them were called for between 1855 and 1877. 
They were also associated at this time in writing 
many prose magazine articles of a humorous 
character, as well as a series of translations of 
Goethe's ballads and minor poems, which, after 
appearing in Blackwood's Magazine, were some 
years afterwards (1858) collected and published 
in a volume. The four pieces above mentioned 
appeared as stated in Tails Edinburgh Magazine 
under the title of "Flowers of Hemp, or the 
Newgate Garland," and are parodies of well-known 
songs. 

The High Pad's Frolic 

and 
The Dashy, Splashy Little Stringer 

Leman Rede (1802-47) an author of numerous 
successful dramatic pieces, and a contributor to 
the weekly and monthly journals of the day, 
chiefly to the New Monthly and Bentley's. He 
was born in Hamburgh, his father a barrister. 



. THE BOULD YEOMAN 241 

Some of the best parts ever played by Liston, 
John Reeve, Charles Mathews, Keeley, and G. Wild 
were written by him. 

The Bould Yeoman 

The Bridle-cull and his little Pop-gun 

Jack Flashman 
Miss Dolly Trull 

and 
The By-blow of the Jug 

See Note to "Sonnets for The Fancy" p. 225. 
Captain Macheath was one of Egan's latest, and 
by no means one of his best, productions. It 
is now very scarce. 

The Cadger's Ball 

John Labern, a once popular, but now forgotten 
music-hall artiste, and song-writer, issued several 
collections of the songs of the day. It is from 
one of these that " The Cadger's Ball " is taken. 

"Dear Bill, This Stone- Jug" 

The state of affairs described in this poem is 
now happily a thing of the past. Newgate, as a 
prison, has almost ceased to be. Only when 
the Courts are sitting do its functions com- 
mence, and then there is constant coming and 
going between the old city gaol and the real 
London prison of to-day, Holloway Castle. 

16 



242 THE LEARY MAN 



The Leary Man 

The Vulgar Tongue, by Ducange Anglicus, is, 
as a glossary, of no account whatever; the only 
thing not pilfered from Brandon's Poverty, Men- 
dicity, and Crime being this song. Where that 
came from deponent knoweth not. 



A Hundred Stretches Hence 

The Rogue's Lexicon, mainly reprinted from 
Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, is of 
permanent interest and value to the philologist 
and student for the many curious survivals of, 
and strange shades of meaning occuring in, slang 
words and colloquilisms after transplantation to 
the States. G. W. Matsell was for a time the 
chief of the New York police. 

The Chickaleary Cove 

Vance, a music-hall singer and composer in 
the sixties, made his first great hit in Jolly Dogs ; 
or Slap-bang ! here zve are again. This was 
followed by The Chickaleary Cove: a classic in 
its way. 

'Arry at a Political Picnic 

The 'Arry Ballads' are too fresh in public 
memory to need extensive quotation. The ex- 
ample given is a fair sample of the series ; which, 
taken as a whole, very cleverly "hit off" the 
idiosyncrasies and foibles of the London larrikin. 

Stanza VIII, line 4. Walker = Be off! 



"RUM COVES THAT RELIEVE US" 243 

"Rum Coves that Relieve us" 

Heinrich Baumann, the author of Londonhmen, 
an English -German glossary of cant and slang, 
to which " Rum Coves that Relieve us " forms 
the preface. 

Villon's Good Night 
Villon's Straight Tip 

and 
Culture in the Slums 

William Ernest Henley, poet, critic, dramatist, 
and editor was born at Gloucester in 1849, 
and educated at the same city. In his early 
years (says Men of the Time] he suffered much 
from ill-health, and the first section of his Book 
of Verses (1888: 4* ed. 1893), In Hospital: 
Rhymes and Rhythms, was a record of expe- 
riences in the Old Infirmary, Edinburgh, in 1873-5. 
In 1875 he began writing for the London maga- 
zines, and in 1877 was one of the founders as 
well as the editor of London. In this journal 
much of his early verse appeared. He was after- 
wards appointed editor of The Magazine of Art, 
and in 1889 of The Scots, afterwards The National 
Observer. To these journals, as well as to The 
Athenaum and Saturday Review he has contri- 
buted many critical articles, a selection of which 
was published in 1890 under the title of Views 
and Reviews. In collaboration with Robert Louis 
Stevenson he has published a volume of plays, one 
of which, Beau Austin, was produced at the Hay- 
market Theatre in 1892. His second volume of 
verses The Song of the Szvord marks a new 
departure in style. He has edited a fine col- 

16 



244 CULTURE IN THE SLUMS 

lection of verses, Lyra Heroica, and, with 
Mr. Charles Whibley, an anthology of English 
prose. In 1893 Mr. Henley received the honour 
of an L.L.D. degree of St. Andrew's university. 
At the present time he is also editing The Nnv 
Review, a series of Tudor Translations, a new 
Byron, a new Burns, and collaborating with Mr. 
J. S. Farmer in Slang and its Analogues; an 
historical dictionary of slang. 

" Villon's Straight Tip : Stanza I, line i. Screeve= 
provide (or work with) begging-letters. Line 2. 
Fake the broads = pack the cards. Fig a nag = 
play the coper with an old horse and a fig of 
ginger. Line 3. Knap a yack = steal a watch. 
Line 4. Pilch a snide = pass a false coin. Smash 
a rag = change a false note. Line 5. Duff = 
sell sham smugglings. Nose and lag = collect 
evidence for the police. Line 6. Get the straight = 
get the office, and back a winner. Line 7. Multy 
(expletive) = "bloody". Line 8. Booze and 
the blowens cop the lot: cf. " 'Tis all to taverns 
and to lasses." (A. Lang). 

Stanza II, line I. Fiddle = swindle. Fence = 
deal in stolen goods. Mace = welsh. Mack = 
pimp. Line a. Moskeneer = to pawn for more 
than the pledge is worth. Flash the drag = wear 
women's clothes for an improper purpose. Line 3. 
Dead-lurk a crib = house-break in church time. 
Do a crack = burgle with violence. Line 4. 
Pad with a slang tramp with a show. Line 5. 
Mump and gag = beg and talk. Line 6. Tats = 
dice. Spot, (at billiards). Line 7. Stag = shilling. 

Stanza III, line 2. Flash your flag = sport 
your apron. Line 4. Mug = make faces. Line 5. 
Nix = nothing. Line 6. Graft = trade. Line 7. 
Goblins = sovereigns. Stravag = go astray. 



" TOTTIE " 245 

The Moral. Line J. Up the spout and Charley 
Wag = expressions of dispersal. Line a. Wipes = 
handkerchiefs. Tickers = watches. Line 3. 
Squeezer = halter. Scrag = neck. 

"Tottie" 
A Plank-Bed Ballad 

and 
The Rondeau of the Knock 

G. R. Sims ("Dagonet") needs little introduc- 
tion to present-day readers. Born in London 
in 1847, he was educated at Han well College, 
and afterwards at Bonn. He joined the staff of 
fun on the death of Tom Hood the younger 
in 1874, and The Weekly Despatch the same 
year. Since 1877 he has been a contributor to 
The Referee under the pseudonym of " Dagonet". 
A voluminous miscellaneous writer, dramatist, 
poet, and novelist, M. Sims shows yet no dimi- 
nution of his versatility and power. 

Wot Cher! 
Our Little Nipper 

and 
The Coster's Serenade 

Albert Chevalier, a " coster poet ", music-hall 
artist, and musician of French extraction was 
born in Hammersmith. He is a careful, competent 
actor of minor parts, and sings his own little 
ditties extremely well. 




APPENDIX. 



THERE are still one or two "waifs and strays" 
to be mentioned: 

I. 

In Don Juan, canto XI, stanzas xvii xix, 
Byron thus describes one of his dramatis persona. 

Poor Tom was once a kiddy upon town, 

A thorough varmint and a real swell . . . 
Full flash, all fancy, until fairly diddled, 
His pockets first, and then his body riddled. 



He from the world had cut off a great man 

Who in his time had made heroic bustle. 

Who in a row like Tom could lead the van, 
Booze in the ken, or in the spellken hustle? 

Who queer a flat ? Who (spite of Bow Street's 

ban) 

On the high-toby-splice so flash the muzzle? 
Who on a lark, with Black-eyed Sal (his blowing) 
So prime, so swell, so nutty, and so knowing? 

In a note Byron says, " The advance of science 
and of language has rendered it unnecessary to 
translate the above good and true English, spoken 



248 APPENDIX 

in its original purity by the select mobility and 
their patrons. The following is the stanza of a 
song which was very popular, at least in my 
early days: 

(" If there be any German so ignorant as to 
require a traduction, I refer him to my old friend 
and corporeal pastor and master John Jackson, 
Esq., Professor of Pugilism.") 

On the high toby splice flash the muzzle 

In spite of each gallows old scout; 
If you at the spellken can't hustle 

You'll be hobbled in making a clout. 
Then your blowing will wax gallows haughty, 

When she hears of your scaly mistake 
She'll surely turn snitch for the forty 

That her Jack may be regular weight. 

John Jackson, to whom is attributed the slang 
song of which the foregoing stanza is a fragment 
was the son of a London builder. He was born 
in London on 28 Sept. 1769, and though he 
fought but thrice, was champion of England from 
1795 to 1803, when he retired, and was succeeded 
by Belcher. After leaving the prize-ring, Jackson 
established a school at No. 13 Bond Street, where 
he gave instructions in the art of self-defence, 
and was largely patronised by the nobility of 
the day. At the coronation of George IV he 
was employed, with eighteen other prize-fighters 
dressed as pages, to guard the entrance to West- 
minster Abbey and Hall. He seems, according 
to the inscription on a mezzotint engraving by 
C. Turner, to have subsequently been landlord of 
the Sun and Punchbowl, Holborn, and of the 
Cock at Sutton. He died on 7 Oct. 1845 at 
No. 4 Lower Grosvenor Street West, London, 



APPENDIX 249 

in his seventy-seventh year, and was buriled in 
Brompton Cemetery, where a colossal monument 
was erected by subscription to his memory. 
Byron, who was one of his pupils, had a great 
regard for him, and often walked and drove with 
him in public. It is related that, while the poet 
was at Cambridge, his tutor remonstrated with 
him on being seen in company so much beneath 
his rank, and that he replied that "Jackson's 
manners were infinitely superior to those of the 
fellows of the college whom I meet at ' the high 
table'" (J. W. Clark, Cambridge, 1890, p. 140). 
He twice alludes to his 'old friend and cor- 
poreal pastor and master' in his notes to his 
poems (Byron, Poetical Works, 1885-6, ii. 144, 
vi. 427), as well as in his 'Hints from Horace' 
(ib. i. 503): 

And men unpractised in exchanging knocks 
Must go to Jackson ere they dare to box. 

Moore, who accompanied Jackson to a prize- 
fight in December 1818, notes in his diary that 
Jackson's house was 'a very neat establishment 
for a boxer', and that the respect paid to him 
everywhere was 'highly comical' (Memoirs, ii. 233). 
A portrait of Jackson, from an original painting 
then in the possession of Sir Henry Smythe, 
bart, will be found in the first volume of Miles's 
' Pugilistica' (opp. p. 89). There are two mezzotint 
engravings by C. Turner. 

II. 

IN Boucicault's Janet Pride (revival by Charles 
Warner at the Adelphi Theatre, London in the 
early eighties) was sung the following (here given 
from memory) : 



250 APPENDIX 

The Convict's Song. 

THE FAREWELL. 

Farewell to old England the beautiful ! 

Farewell to my old pals as well ! 
Farewell to the famous Old Ba-i-ly 

( Whistle}. 

Where I used for to cut sich a swell. 

Ri-chooral, ri-chooral, Oh! ! ! 

THE [WERDHICK ?] 

These seving long years I've been serving, 

And seving I've got for to stay, 
All for bashin' a bloke down our a-alley, 

( Whistle). 
And a' takin' his huxters away ! 

THE COMPLAINT. 

There's the Captain, wot is our Commanduer, 

There's the Bosun and all the ship's crew, 
There's the married as well as the single 'uns, 

( Whistle). 
Knows wot we pore convicks goes through. 

THE [SUFFERING?] 

It ain't' cos they don't give us grub enough, 

It ain't' cos they don't give us clo'es : 
It's a-cos all we light-fingred gentery 

( Whistle). 
Goes about with a log on our toes. 

THE PRAYER. 

Oh, had I the wings of a turtle-dove, 

Across the broad ocean I'd fly, 
Right into the arms of my Policy love 

( Whistle). 
And on her soft bosum I'd lie ! 



APPENDIX 251 

THE MORRELL. 

Now, all you young wi-counts and duchesses, 

Take warning by wot I've to say, 
And mind all your own wot you touches is, 

(Whistle}. 

Or you'll jine us in Botinny Bay ! 
Oh!!! 

Ri-chooral, ri-chooral, ri-addiday, 
Ri-chooral, ri-chooral, iday. 





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